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SEVENTY-FIVE 



RECEIPTS, 



roit 



PASTRY, CAKES, AXJD SWEETMEATS. 



BY A LADY OF PHILADELPHIA. 



VJ U 



BOSTON : 

Ml Mini. AND FRANCIS, NO. 128, WASHINGTON -STREKT, 
C. S. FRANCIS . BROADW AY, NEW-IUKK. 

1828. 



DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, TO WIT '. 

District Clerk's Office. 

Be it remembered, that on the seventeenth clay of January, A.I). 
1C28, in the fifty-second year of the Independence of theUnited States of 
America, Mijnroe & Francis, of the said district, have deposited in 
this Office, the Title of a Book, the right Ivhereof they claim as Pro- 
prietors, in the words following", to wit' 

" Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats. By 
a Lady of Philadelphia." 

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United Stales, enti- 
tled, " An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing- the cop- 
ies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such 
copies, during the times therein mentioned j w and also to an act enti- 
d I, An act supplementary to an act, entitled, an act for the encour- 
ageoiejlt of learning , by securing the copies of maps, charts and books 
to tiie authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein 
ii" utioned ; and extending die benefits thereof to the arts of designing', 
engraving and etching historical and other prints/' 

JOHN W. DAVIS, Clerk of the District of Massachusetts. 



WEIGHT AM) MEASURE. 



As all families arc not provided with scales and 
weights, referring to the ingredients generally used in 
I takm and pastry, we subjoin a list of weights and 
measures. 

WEIGHT AND MEASURE. 
Wheat flour - - one pound is one quart. 

Indian meal - - one pound, two ounces, is one quart. 
Butter — when soft - one pound, one ounce, is one quart. 
Loaf-sugar, broken one pound is one quart. 

White su^a-, powdered one pound, one ounce, is one quar«. 
Best brown sugar - one pound, two ounces, one quart. 

Eggs - ten eggs are - - one pound. ' 



LIQUID MEASURE. 

Sixteen large table-spoonfuls are - half a pint. 

Eight large table-spoonfuls arc - one gill. 

Four large table-spoonfuls are - half a gill. 

A common-sized tumbler holds ... half a pint. 

A common-sized wine-glass - half a gill. 

Allowing for accidental differences in the quality, 
freshness, dryness, and moisture of the articles, we bo- 
lieve t! : s comparison between weight and measure, to 
be as nearly correct as possible. 



ERRATA. 

Page 9. line 5. for il ore soiip-pl'ite 1 - read " one soi'p-plalc pit '." 
P. 20. 5th line from boUom, for Put long slits''' read " Cut long 
ulits." 

P. 08. 7th i. from bot. for "Jive ounces of butter" read " sir ounces." 
P. 78. I. 3. fv • " lay them on a brass or bell-metal kettle'' read u lay 
ibera in a brats or bell-metal kettle." 

P. 81. 1. 12. lor " set Uiem in boiling water" read il set it. in boiling 



FAMILY BOOKS. 

At the Bookstore of the publishers of this Work may be found the 
following excellent books for families. Y 6 

The COOKS ORACLE : containing Receipts for plain Cookery 
™£» IT' ec ? m,n "f al P' a ," f °'" Private B families : also, Ve art of com-' 
posing the most simple and the most highly finished Broths GraviS 
Soups feauces Store Sauces, and Flavouring Essences The quan-' 
*Llf* , Ar " cle ' s accurately stated by "weight and measure^ the 
whole bemg the resu t ol I Actual Experiments, instituted in the KUch- 
Z It P ^ s '?' a \ Ms™* u He Juki." Second American from 
the last London Edition, which is almost entirely re-written W ith 
an Appendix, by the American publishers. Marketing Tables &c 
P rha?e H SERVANT'S DIRECTORY, or a Monitor for 
aZl lr * am,l,t /\ : ™»P>"'sing hmts on the arrangement and perform- 
a ,oe of tenants Work, with general rules for sating out Tables and 
Sideboards ,„l,rst order The art of Waiting,,, all its branches ; and 
likewise how to conduct Large and Small Parties with order: with 

fw W rCC lT/n- Plar "' ? ° r 'r Tal>le a " k-ds of Join J/F ^h, 
r£l' » ' "' fu " lns !r, uol ' ous ™r cleaning Plate, Brass. Steel 
Glass, Mahogany; and likewise, all kinds of Patent and Common 
Lamps : Observations on Servants' Behaviour to their Employers" 
and upwards of 100 various and useful Receipts, chiefly compiled for 
the useot House Servants, and identically made to suit the Manners 
and Customs of Fam,l,cs ,n the United States. By Robert Robert? 
M ith friendly Ady.ce to Cooks and Heads of families, and complete 
Directions how to burn Lehigh Coal, &c. &c. "-onipiete 



PREFACE. 



The following Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, 
and Sweetmeats, are all original, and have 
been used by the author and many of her 
friends with uniform success. They are 
drawn up in a style so plain and minute, as 
to be perfectly intelligible to servants, and 
persons of the most moderate capacity. All 
the ingredients, with their proper quantities, 
are enumerated in a list at the head of each 
receipt, a plan which will greatly facilitate 
the business of procuring and preparing the 
requisite articles. 

There is frequently much difficulty in fol- 
lowing directions in English and French 
Cookery Books, not only from their want 
of explicitness, but from the difference in the 
fuel, fire-places, and cooking utensils gener- 
ally used in Europe and America; and many 
of the European receipts are so complicated 
and laborious, that our female cooks are 
afraid to undertake the arduous task of 
making any thing from them. 



iv 



The receipts in this little book are, in 
every sense of the word, American ; but the 
writer flatters herself that (if exactly follow- 
ed) the articles produced from them will not 
be found inferior to any of a similar descrip- 
tion made in the European manner. Expe- 
rience has proved, that pastry, cakes, &c. 
prepared precisely according to these direc- 
tions will not fail to be excellent ; but where 
economy is expedient, a portion of the sea- 
soning, that is, the spice, wine, brandy, rose- 
water, essence of lemon, &c. may be omit- 
ted without any essential deviation of fla- 
vour, or difference of appearance ; retaining, 
however, the given proportions of eggs, but- 
ter, sugar, and flour. 

But if done at home, and by a person 
that can be trusted, it will be proved, on 
trial, that any of these articles may be made 
in the best and most liberal manner at one 
half of the cost of the same articles suppli- 
ed by a confectioner. And "they will be 
found particularly useful to families that live 
in the country or in small towns, where no- 
thing of the kind is to be purchased. 
January 15th, 1828. 



CONTENTS. 



PART THE FIRST. 



Preliminary Remarks, • 


7 


Puff Paste, - 




Common Paste, - 


12 


Mince Pies, - 


- 13 


Plum Pudding, - 


14 


Lemon Pudding, 


- 15 


Orange Pudding, - 


17 


Cocoa Nut Pudding, 


- 18 


Almond Pudding, - 


19 


A Cheesecake, 


- ib. 


Sweet Potato Pudding, - 


21 


Pumpkin Pudding, - 


- ib. 


Gooseberry Pudding, - 


22 


Baked Apple Pudding, 


- 23 


Fruit Pies. - 


23 


Oyster Pie, - 


- 25 


BeefSteak Pie, - 


26 


Indian Pudding, - 


- 27 


Batter Pudding, - 


28 


Bread Pudding, 


- . - - 29 


Rice Pudding, - 


ib. 



vi 



CONTENTS. 



Boston Pudding-, - - - - - - 30 

Fritters, - - - - - - 31 

Fine Custards, - - - - - - ib. 

Plain Custards, ------ 32 

Rice Custard, - - - - - - 33 

Cold Custards, - - - - - 34 

Curds and Whey, - - - - - ib. 

A Trifle, ...... 35 

Whipt Cream, - .... 36 

Floating Island, - - 37 

Ice Cream, - - - - - - - ib. 

Calves-Feet Jelly, ..... 38 

Blancmange, - - - - - 40 



PART THE SECOND. 

General Directions, - - - - - 45 

Queen Calfe, - - - - - 47 

Pound Cake, - - - - - - 48 

Black Cake, or Plum Cake, - ... 50 

Sponge Cake, - - - - - 51 

Almond Cake, ------ 52 

French Almond Cake, - - - - - 54 

Maccaroons, - - - - - - 55 

Apees, - - - - - -56 

Jumbles, 57 

Kisses, - - - - - - -58 

Spanish Buns, ------ ib. 

Rusk, -.- - - . -60 

Indian Pound Cake, - - - - - 61 

Cup Cake, ib 



CONTENTS. Vii 

Loaf Cake, ------ 62 

Sugar Biscuits, - - - - - ib. 

Milk Biscuits, ------ 63 

Butter Biscuits, - - - - - 64 

Gingerbread Nuts, ----- 65 

Common Gingerbread, - - - - - 66 

Lafayette Gingerbread, ----- 67 

A Dover Cake, - - - - - - 68 

Crullers, - - - - 69 

Dough Nuts, - - - - - - 70 

Waffles, - ib. 

Soft Muffins, 71 

Indian Batter Cakes, ----- 72 

Flannel Cakes, - - - - - - ib. 

Rolls, - - - . - - 73 



PART THE THIRD. 



General Directions, - - - - - 77 

Apple Jelly, ------ 78 

Red Currant Jelly, - - - - - - ib. 

Black Currant Jelly, ----- 79 

Gooseberry Jelly, - - - - - - 80 

Wild Grape Jelly, ----- ib. 

Peach Jelly, ------- 81 

Preserved Quinces, ----- ib. 

Preserved Pippins, - - - - - - 82 

Preserved Peaches, ----- 83 

Preserved Crab Apples, - - - - - 84 

Preserved Plums, ----- ib. 



Vlll 



CONTENTS. 



Preserved Strawberries, 
Preserved Cranberries, - 
Preserved Pumpkin, 
Preserved Pine-Apple, - 
Raspberry Jam, 



PART THE FIRST. 



PASTRY. 



PRELIMINARY REMARKS. 

In making pastry or cakes, it is best to begin by 
weighing out the ingredients, sifting the flour, 
pounding and sifting the sugar and spice, washing 
the butter, and preparing the fruit. 

Sugar can be pow T dered by pounding it in a large 
mortar, or by rolling it on a paste-board with a 
rolling-pin. It should be made very fine and al- 
ways sifted. 

All sorts of spice should be pounded in a mortar 
except nutmeg, which it is better to grate. If spice 
is wanted in large quantities, it may be ground in a 
mill. 

The butter should always be fresh and very good. 
Wash it in cold water before you use it, and then 
make it up with your hands into hard lumps, squeez- 
ing the water well out. 

If the butter and sugar are to be stirred together, 
always do that before the eggs are beaten, as, (un- 
less they are kept too w r arm) the butter and sugar 
will not be injured by standing awhile. For stir- 
ring them, nothing is so convenient as a round hick- 
ory stick about a foot and a half long, and some- 
what flattened at one end. 



a 



PASTRY. 



The eggs should not be beaten till after all the 
other ingredients are ready, as they will fall very 
soon. If the whites and yolks are to be beaten 
separately, do the whites first, as they will stand 
longer. 

Eggs should be beaten in a broad shallow pan 
spreading wide at the top. Butter and sugar 
should be stirred in a deep pan with straight sides 

Break every egg by itself, in a saucer, before 
you put it into the pan, that in case there should be 
any bad ones, they may not spoil the others. 

Eggs are beaten most expeditiously with rods 
A small quantity of white of egg may be beaten 
with a knife, or a three-pronged fork. 



There can be no positive rules as to the exact 
time of baking each article. Skill in baking is the 
result of practice, attention, and experience. Much 
of course, depends on the state of the fire, and on 
the size of the things to be baked, and something 
on the thickness of the pans or dishes. 

If you bake in a stove, put some bricks in the 
oven part to set the pans or plates on, atid to tem- 
per the heat at the bottom. Large sheets of iron, 
without sides, will be found very useful for small 
cakes, and to put under the pans or plates. 



PASTRY. 



9 



PUFF PASTE. 

Half a pound and two ounces of siAed flour. 
Half a pound of ihe best fresh butter — washed. 
A little cold water. 

This will make puff-paste for two puddings, or for one soup-plate, 
or four small shells. 



Weigh half a pound and two ounces of flour, and 
sift it through a hair sieve into a large deep dish. 
Take out about one fourth of the flour, and lay it 
aside on one corner of your paste-board, to roll and 
sprinkle with. 

Wash, in cold water, half a pound of the best 
fresh butter. Squeeze it hard with your hands, and 
make it up into a round lump. Divide it in four 
equal parts ; lay them on one side of your paste- 
board, and have ready a glass of cold water. 

Cut one of the four pieces of butter into the pan 
of flour. Cut it as small as possible. Wet it, grad- 
ually, with a very little water (too much water will 
make it tough) and mix it well with the point of a 
large case-knife. Do not touch it with your hands. 
When the dough gets into a lump, sprinkle on the 
middle of the board some of the flour that you laid 
aside, and lay the dough upon it, turning it out of 
the pan with the knife. 

Rub the rolling-pin with flour, and sprinkle a lit- 
tle on tha lump of paste. Roll it out thin quickly 
and evenly, pressing on the rolling-pin very lightly. 
Then take the second of the four pieces of butter, 
and, with the point of your knife, stick it in little 
bits at equal distances all over the sheet of paste. 
Sprinkle on some flour, and fold up the dough. 



10 



PASTRY. 



Flour the paste-board and rolling-pin again ; throw 
a little flour on the paste and roll it out a second 
time. Stick the third piece of butter all over it 
in little bits. Throw on some flour, fold up the 
paste, sprinkle a little more flour on the dough, and 
on the rolling-pin, and roll it out a third time, al- 
ways pressing on it lightly. Stick it over with the 
fourth and last piece of butter. Throw on a little 
more flour, fold up the paste and then roll it out in 
a large round sheet. Cut ofF the sides, so as to 
make the sheet of a square form, and lay the slips 
of dough upon the square sheet. Fold it up with 
the small pieces or trimmings, in the inside. Score 
or notch it a little with the knife ; lay it on a plate 
and set it away in a cool place, but not where it 
can freeze, as that will make it heavy. Having 
made the paste, prepare and mix your pudding or 
pie. When the mixture is finished, bring out your 
paste, flour the board and rolling-pin, and roll it 
out with a short quick stroke, and pressing the roll- 
ing-pin rather harder than while you were putting 
the butter in. If the paste rises in blisters, it will 
be light, unless spoiled in baking. 

Then cut the sheet in half, fold up each piece 
and roll them out once more, separately, in round 
sheets the size of your plate. Press on rather 
harder, but not too hard. Roll the sheets thinnest 
in the middle and thickest at the edges. If intend- 
ed for puddings, lay them in buttered soup-plates, 
and trim them evenly round the edges. If the 
edges do not appear thick enough, you may take 
the trimmings, put them all together, roll them out, 
and having cut them in slips the breadth of the rim 
of the plate, lay them all round to make the paste 
thicker at the edges, joining them nicely and evenly, 
as every patch or crack will appear distinctly when 



PASTRY. 



11 



baked. Notch the rim handsomely with a very- 
sharp knife. Fill the dish with the mixture of the 
pudding, and bake it in a moderate oven. The 
paste should be of a light brown colour. If the 
oven is too slow, it will be soft and clammy ; if too 
quick, it will not have time to rise as high as it 
ought to do. 

In making the best puff-paste, try to avoid using 
more flour to sprinkle and roll with, than the small 
portion which you have laid aside for that purpose 
at the beginning. If you make the dough too soft 
at first, by using too much water, it will be sticky, 
and require more flour, and will eventually be 
tough when baked. Do not put your hands to it, 
as their warmth will injure it. Use the knife in- 
stead. Always roll from you rather than to you, 
and press lightly on the rolling-pin, except at 
the last. 

It is difficult to make puff-paste in the summer, 
unless in a cellar, or very cool room, and on a mar- 
ble table. The butter should, if possible, be wash- 
ed the night before, and kept covered with ice till 
you use it next day. The water should have ice in 
it, and the butter should be iced as it sets on the 
paste-board. After the paste is mixed, it should 
be put in a covered dish, and set in cold water till 
you are ready to give it the last rolling. With all 
these precautions to prevent its being heavy, it will 
not rise as well, or be in any respect as good as in 
cold weather. 



12 



PASTRY. 



COMMON PASTE FOR PIES. 

A pound and a half of sifted flour. 

Three quarters of a pound of butter — washed. 

This will make one large pie, or two small ones. 

Sift the flour into a pan. Put the butter into two 
equal parts. Put one half of the butter into the 
flour, and cut it up as small as possible. Mix it 
well with the flour, wetting it gradually w r ith a little 
cold water. 

Spread some flour on your paste-board, take the 
lump of paste out of the pan, flour your rolling-pin, 
and roll out the paste into a large sheet. Then 
stick it over with the remaining half of the butter 
in small pieces, and laid at equal distances. Throw 
on a little flour, fold up the sheet of paste, flour it 
slightly, and roll it out again. Then fold it up, 
and cut it in half or in four, according to the size 
of your pies. Roll it out into round sheets the size 
of your pie-plates, pressing rather harder on the 
rolling-pin. 

Butter your pie-plates, lay on your under crust, 
and trim the edge. Fill the dish with the ingredi- 
ents of which the pie is composed, and lay on the 
lid, in which you must prick some holes, or cut a 
small slit in the top. Crimp the edges with a sharp 
knife. 

Heap up the ingredients so that the pie will be 
highest in the middle. 

Some think it makes common paste more crisp 
and light to beat it hard on both sides with the 



PASTRY. 



13 



rolling-pin, after you give it the first rolling, when 
all the butter is in. 

If the butter is very fresh, you may mix with the 
flour a salt spoonful of salt. 



One pound and a half of boiled beef's heart, or fresh tongue- 
chopped when cold. 
Two pounds of beef suet, chopped fine. 
Four pounds of pippin apples, chopped. 
Two pounds of raisins, stoned and chopped. 
Two pounds of currants, picked, washed and dried. 
Two pounds of powdered sugar. 
One quart of white wine. 
One quart of brandy. 
One wine-glass of rose-water. 
Two grated nutmegs. 
Half an ounce of cinnamon } 



Parboil a beef's heart, or a fresh tongue. After 
you have taken off the skin and fat, weigh a pound 
and a half. When it is cold, chop it very fine, 
Take the inside of the suet ; weigh two pounds, 
and chop it as fine as possible. Mix the meat and 
suet together, adding the salt. Pare, core, and 
chop the apples, and then stone and chop the rai- 
sins. Having prepared the currants, add them to 
the other fruit, and mix the fruit with the meat and 
suet. Put in the sugar and spice, and the grated 
peel and juice of the oranges. Wet the whole 
with the rose-water and liquor, and mix all well 
together. 



MINCE PIES. 



A quarter of an ounce of cloves 
A quarter of an ounce of mace 
A tea-spoonful of salt. 
Two large oranges. 
Haifa pound of citron, cut in slips. 




2 



14 



PASTRY. 



Make the paste, allowing, for each pie, half a 
pound of butter and three quarters of a pound of 
sifted flour. Make it in the same manner as puff- 
paste, but it will not be quite so rich. Lay a sheet 
of paste all over a soup-plate. Fill it with mince- 
meat, laying slips of citron on the top. Roll out a 
sheet of paste, for the lid of the pie. Put it on, 
and crimp the edges with a knife. Prick holes ia 
the lid. 

Bake the pies half an hour in a brisk oven. 

Keep your mince-meat in a jar tightly covered. 
Set it in a dry cool place, and occasionally add 
more brandy to it. 



PLUM PUDDING. 

One pound of raisins, stoned and cut in half. 
One pound of currants, picked, washed, and dried. 
One pound of beef suet, chopped fine. 
One pound of grated stale bread, or a pound of flour, 
Eight eggs. 

A quar ter of a pound of sugar. 
A pint of milk. 
A glass of brandy. 
A glass of wine. 
Two nutmegs, grated. 

A table-spoonful of mixed cinnamon and mace. 
A salt-spoonful of salt. 



You must prepare all your ingredients the day 
before (except beating the eggs) that in the morning 
you may have nothing to do but to mix them, as 
the pudding will require six hours to boil. 

Beat the eggs very light, then put to them half 
the milk and beat both together. Stir in gradually 
the flour or grated bread. Next add the sugar by 
degrees. Then the and fruit alternately. The 



PASTRY. 



15 



fruit must be well sprinkled with flour, lest it sink 
to the bottom. Stir very hard. Then add the 
spiee and liquor, and lastly the remainder of the 
milk. Stir the whole mixture very well together. 
If it is not thick enough, add a little more grated 
bread or flour. If there is too much bread or flour, 
the pudding will be hard and heavy. 

Dip your pudding-cloth in boiling water, shake it 
out and sprinkle it slightly with flour. Lay it in a 
pan, and pour the mixture into the cloth. Tie it 
up carefully, allowing room for the pudding to 
swell. Boil it six hours and turn it carefully out of 
the cloth. 

Before you send it to table, have ready some 
blanched sweet almonds cut in slips, or some slips 
of citron, or both. Stick them all over the outside 
of the pudding. 

Eat it with wine, or with a sauce made of drawn 
butter, wine and nutmeg. 

The pudding will be improved if you add to the 
other ingredients, the grated rind of a large lemon 
or orange. 



LEMON PUDDING. 

One large lemon, with a smooth thin rind. 
Three eggs. 

A quarter of a pound of powdered white sugar. 
A quarter of a pound of fresh butter — washed. 
Haifa glass of white wine and brandy, mixed. 
A tea-spoonful of rose-water. 

Five ounces of sifted flour, and a quarter of a pound of fresh butter 
for the paste. 

Grate the yellow part of the rind of a large fresh 
e mon. Then cut the lemon in half, and squeeze 



16 



PASTRY. 



the juice into the plate that contains the grated 
rind, carefully taking out all the seeds. Mix the 
juice and rind together. 

Put a quarter of a pound of powdered white su- 
gar into a deep earthen pan, and cut up in it a quar- 
ter of a pound of the best fresh butter. If the 
weather is very cold, set the pan near the fire, for 
a few minutes to soften the butter, but do not al- 
low it to melt or it will be heavy. Stir the butter 
and sugar together with a stick or wooden spoon, 
till it is perfectly light and of the consistence of 
cream. 

Put4he eggs in a shallow broad pan, and beat 
them with an egg-beater or rods till they are quite 
smooth, and as thick as a boiled custard. Then 
stir the eggs, gradually, into the pan of butter 
and sugar. Add the liquor and rose-water by de- 
grees, and then stir in, gradually, the juice and grated 
rind of the lemon. Stir the whole very hard, after 
all the ingredients are in. 

Have ready a puff-paste made of five ounces of 
sifted flour,- and a quarter of a pound of fresh but- 
ter. The paste must be made with as little water 
as possible. Roll it out in a circular sheet, thin in 
the centre, and thicker towards the edges, and just 
large enough to cover the bottom, sides, and edges 
of a soup-plate. Butter the soup-plate very well, 
and lay the paste in it, making it neat and even 
round the broad edge of the plate. With a sharp 
knife, trim off the superfluous dough, and notch 
the edges. Put in the mixture with a spoon, and 
bake the pudding about half an hour, in a moderate 
oven. It should be baked of a very light brown. 
If the oven is too hot, the paste will not have time 
to rise well. If too cold, it will be clammy. When 
the pudding is cool, grate loaf-sugar over it. 



PASTRY. 



17 



ORANGE PUDDIJVG. 

One large orange, of a deep colour, and smooth thin rind. 
One lime. 

A quarter of a pound of powdered white sugar. 
A quarter of a pound of fresh butter. 
Three eggs. 

Half a glass of mixed wine and brandy. 
A tea-spoonful of rose-water. 

Grate the yellow rind of the orange and lime, 
and squeeze the juice into a saucer or soup-plate, 
taking out all the seeds. 

Stir the butter and sugar to a cream. 

Beat the eggs as light as possible, and tfyen stir 
them by degrees into the pan of butter and sugar. 
Add, gradually, the liquor and rose-water, and 
then by degrees, the orange and lime. Stir all 
well together. 

Have ready a sheet of puff-paste made of five 
ounces of sifted flour, and a quarter of a pound 
of fresh butter. Lay the paste in a buttered soup- 
plate. Trim and notch the edges, and then put in 
the mixture. Bake it about half an hour, in a mode- 
rate oven. Grate loaf-sugar over it, before you 
send it to table. 



COCOA-NUT PUDDJNG. 

A quarter of a pound of cocoa-nut, grated. 
A quarter of a pound of powdered white sugar. 
Three ounces and a half of fresh butter. 
The whites only of six eggs. 
Half a glass of wine and brandy mixed. 
Half a tea-spoonful of rose-water. 



Break up a cocoa-nut, and take the thin brown 
skin carefully off, with a knife. Wash all the 
2* 



18 



PASTRY. 



pieces ,n cold water, and then wipe them dry, with 
a clean towel. Weigh a quarter of a pound of 
cocoa-nut and grate it very fine, into a soT-pltf 

Sur the butter and sugar to a cream, and add the 
liquor and rose-water gradually to them. 

Beat the whites only of six eggs, till they stand 
alone on the rods ; and then stirfhe beate f vl he 
of egg gradually mto the butter and sugar. After! 
wards sprinkle in, by degrees, the grated cocoa- 
affSaJ? - TheLtiraZ; 

Have ready a puff-paste sufficient to cover the 
bottom s.des, and edges of a soup-plate. Put in 

Grate loaf-sugar over it, when cool. 



AliMOJfD PTJDDIJVG. 

A quarter of a pound of tatter 

A quarter of a pound of powdered white sugar 

Haifa glass of nuxed brandy, wine, and rose-water. 

Shell half a pound of sweet almonds, and pour 
scalding water over them, which will make ffie 
skms pea off. As they get cool, pour mo" boil ng 
water tdl the almonds are all blanched. Blanch* 
also the bitter almonds. As you blanch the al- 
monds throw them into a bowl of co ld water 
rhen take them out, one by one, wipe them dry in 



PASTRY. 



19 



a clean towel, and lay them on a plate. Pound 
them one at a time to a fine paste, in a marble mortar, 
adding, as you pound them, a few drops of rose- 
water to prevent their oiling. Pound the bitter and 
sweet almonds alternately, that they may be well 
mixed. They must be made perfectly fine and 
smooth, and .are the better for being prepared the 
day before they are wanted for the pudding. 

Stir the butter and sugar to a cream, and add 
to it, gradually, the liquor. 

Beat the whites of six eggs till they stand alone. 
Stir the almonds and white of eggs, alternately, 
into the butter and sugar ; and then stir the whole 
well together. 

Have ready a puff-paste sufficient for a soup- 
plate. Butter the plate, lay on the paste, trim and 
notch it. Then put in the mixture. 

Bake it about half an hour in a moderate oven, 

Grate loaf-sugar over it. 



A CHEESECAKE. 

Four eggs. 

Half a gill of milk. 

A quarter of a pound of butter. 

A quarter of a pound of powdered sugar. 

Two ounces of grated bread. 

Half a glass of mixed brandy and wine. 

A tea-spoonful of rose-water. 

A tea-spoonful of mace, cinnamon, and nutmeg, mixed. 
A quarter of a pound of currants. 



Pick the currants very clean. Wash them 
through a cullender, wipe them in a towel, and 
then dry them on a dish before the fire. 

When dry, take out a few to scatter over the 



30 



PASTRY. 



top of the cheesecake, lay them aside, and sprinkle 
the remainder of the currants with flour. 

Stir the butter and sugar to a cream. Grate the 
bread, and prepare the spice. Beat the eggs very 
light. 

Boil the milk. When it comes to a boil, add to 
it half the beaten egg, and boil both together till it 
becomes a curd, stirring it frequently with a knife. 
Then throw the grated bread on the curd, and stir 
all together. Then take the milk, egg, and bread 
off the fire, and stir it, gradually, into the butter 
and sugar. Next, stir in the remaining half of 
the egg. 

Add, by degrees, the liquor and spice. 

Lastly, stir in, gradually, the currants. 

Have ready a puff-paste, which should be made 
before you prepare the cheesecake, as the mixture 
will become heavy by standing. Before you put it 
into the oven, scatter the remainder of the currants 
over the top. 

Bake it half an hour in rather a quick oven. 

Do not sugar the top. 

You may bake it either in a soup-plate, or in two 
small tin patty-pans, which, for cheesecakes, should 
be of a square shape. If baked in square patty- 
pans, leave at each side a flap of paste in the shape 
of a half-circle. Put long slits in these flaps, and 
turn them over, so that they will rest on the top 
of the mixture. 

You can, if you chuse, add to the currants a few 
raisins stoned, and cut in half. 



PASTRY. 



21 



SWEET POTATO PUDDING. 

A quarter of a pound of boiled sweet potato. 
Three eggs. 

A quarter of a pound of powdered white sugar. 
A quarter of a pound of fresh butter. 
A glass of mixed wine and brandy. 
A half-glass of rose-water. 

A tea-spoonful of mixed spice, nutmeg, mace and cinnamon. 



Pound the spice, allowing a smaller proportion 
of inace than of nutmeg and cinnamon. 

Boil and peal some sweet potatoes, and when 
they are cold, weigh a quarter of a pound. Mash 
the sweet potato very smooth, and rub it through a 
sieve. Stir the sugar and butter to a cream. 

Beat the eggs very light, and stir them into the 
butter and sugar, alternately with the sweet potato. 
Add by degrees the liquor, rose-water and spice. 
Stir all very hard together. 

Spread puff-paste on a soup-plate. Put in the 
mixture, and bake it about half an hour in a mode- 
rate oven. 

Grate sugar over it. 



PUMPKIN PUDDING. 

A quarter of a pound of stewed pumpkin. 
Three eggs. 

A quarter of a pound of fresh butter, or a pint of cream. 
A quarter of a pound of powdered white sugar. 
Haifa glass of wine and brandy mixed. 
Half a glass of rose-water. 

A tea-spoonful of mixed spice, nutmeg, mace and cinnamon. 

Stew some pumpkin with as little water as pos- 
sible. Drain it in a cullender, and press it till dry. 
When cold, weigh a quarter of a pound, and pass 



22 



PASTRY. 



it through a sieve. Prepare the spice. Stir togeth- 
er the sugar, and butter, or cream, till they are per- 
fectly light. Add to them, gradually, the spice and 
liquor. 

Beat three eggs very light, and stir them into the 
butter and sugar alternately with the pumpkin. 

Cover a soup-plate with puff-paste, and put in the 
mixture. Bake it in a moderate oven about half 
an hour. 

Grate sugar over it, when cool. 



Instead of the butter, you may boil a pint of 
milk or cream, and when cold, stir into it in turn 
the sugar, eggs, and pumpkin. 



GOOSEBERRY PUDDING. 

A pint of stewed gooseberries, with all their juice. 
A quarter of a pound of powdered sugar. 
Two ounces of fresh butter. 
Two ounces of grated bread. 
Three eggs. 



Stew the gooseberries till quite soft. When they 
are cold, mash them fine with the back of a spoon, 
and stir into them two ounces of sugar. Take 
two ounces more of sugar, and stir it to a cream 
with two ounces of butter. 

Grate very fine, as much stale bread as will 
weigh two ounces. 

Beat three eggs, and stir them into the but- 
ter and sugar, in turn with the gooseberries, and 
bread. 



PASTRY. 



23 



Lay puff-paste in a soup-plate. Put in the mix- 
ture, and bake it half an hour. 
Do not grate sugar over it. 



BAKED APPLE PUDDING. 

A pint of stewed apple. 

Haifa pint of cream, or two ounces of butter. 

A quarter of a pound of powdered sugar. 

A nutmeg, grated. 

A table-spoonful of rose water. 

«A tea-spoonful of grated lemon-peel. 



Stew your apple in as little water as possible, 
and not long enough for the pieces to break and 
lose their shape. Put them in a cullender to drain, 
and mash them with the back of a spoon. If 
stewed too long, and in too much water, they will 
lose their flavour. When cold, mix with them the 
nutmeg, rose-water, and lemon-peel, and two ounces 
of sugar. Stir the other two ounces of sugar, with 
the butter or cream, and then mix it gradually with 
the apple. 

Bake it in puff-paste, in a soup-dish about half 
an hour in a moderate oven. 
Do not sugar the top. 



FRUIT PIES. 

Fruit pies for family use, are generally made 
with common paste, allowing three quarters of a 
pound of butter to a pound and a half of flour. 

Peaches and plums, for pies, should be cut in 
half, and the stones taken out. Cherries also 



24 



PASTRY. 



should be stoned, and red cherries only should be 
used for pies. 

Apples should be cut into very thin slices, and 
are much improved by a little lemon-peel. Sweet 
apples are not good for pies, as they are very in- 
sipid when baked, and seldom get thoroughly done. 
If green apples are used, they should first be stew- 
ed in as little water as possible, and made very 
sweet. 

Apples, stewed previous to baking, should not be 
done tHl^hey break, but only till they are tender. 
They should then be drained in a cullender, and 
chopped fine with a knife or the edge of a spoon. 

In making pies of juicy fruit, it is a good way to 
set a small tea-cup on the bottom crust, and lay 
the fruit all round it. The juice will collect under 
the cup, and not run out at the edges or top of the 
pie. The fruit should be mixed with a sufficient 
quantity of sugar, and piled up in the middle, so as 
to make the pie highest in the centre. The upper 
crust should be pricked with a fork, or have a slit 
cut in the middle. The edges should be nicely 
crimped with a knife. 

Dried peaches, dried apples, and cranberries 
should be stewed with a very little water, and allow- 
ed to get quite cold before they are put into the 
pie. If stewed fruit is put in warm, it will make 
the paste heavy. 

If your pies are made in the form of shells, or 
without lids, the fruit should always be stewed first, 
or it will not be sufficiently done, as the shells 
(which should be of puff-paste) must not bake so 
long as covered pies. 

Shells intended for sweetmeats, must be baked 
empty, and the fruit put into them before they go 
to table. 



PASTRY. 



25 



Fruit pies with lids, should have loaf-sugar grated 
over them. If they have been baked the day be- 
fore, they should be warmed in the stove, or near 
the fire, before they are sent to table, to soften the 
crust, and make them taste fresh. 

Raspberry and apple-pies are much improved by 
taking off the lid, and pouring in a little cream, 
just before they go to table. Replace the lid very 
carefully. 

OYSTER PIE. 

A hundred large fresh oysters, or more if small. 

The yolks of six eggs boiled hard. 

A large slice of stale-bread, grated. 

A tea-spoonful of salt. 

A table-spoonful of pepper. 

A table-spoonful of mixed spice, nutmeg, mace and cinnamon. 



Take a large round dish, butter it, and spread a 
rich paste over the sides, and round the edge, but 
not at the bottom. 

Salt oysters will not do for pies. They should 
be fresh, and as large and fine as possible. 

Drain off part of the liquor from the oysters. 
Put them into a pan, and season them with pepper, 
salt and spice. Stir them well with the seasoning. 
Have ready the yolks of eggs, chopped fine, and 
the grated bread. Pour the oysters (with as much 
of their liquor as you please) into the dish that has 
the paste in it. Strew over them the chopped egg 
and grated bread. 

Roll out the lid of the pie, and put it on, crimp- 
ing the edges handsomely. 

Take a small sheet of paste, cut it into a square 
3 



25 



PASTRY. 



and roll it up. Cut it with a sharp knife into the 
form of a double tulip. 

Make a slit in the centre of the upper crust, and 
stick the tulip in it. 

Cut out eight large leaves of paste, and lay them 
on the lid. 

Bake the pie in a quick oven. 



If you think the oysters will be too much done 
by baking them in the crust, you can substitute 
for them, pieces of bread, to keep up the lid of 
the pie. 

Put the oysters with their liquor and the season- 
ing, chopped egg, grated bread, &c. into a pan. 
Cover them closely, and let them just come to a 
boil, taking them off the fire, and stirring them fre- 
quently. 

When the crust is baked, take the lid neatly off 
(loosening it round the edge with a knife) take out 
the pieces of bread, and put in the oysters. Lay 
the lid on again very carefully. 



For oysterpatties, the oysters are prepared in the 
same manner. They may be chopped if you choose. 
They must be put in small shells of puff-paste. 



BEEF-STEAK PIE. 

Butter a deep dish, and spread a sheet of paste 
all over the bottom, sides, and edge. 

Cut away from your beef-steak all the bone, fat, 
gristle, and skin. Cut the lean in small thin pieces, 
about as large, generally, as the palm of your hand. 
Beat the meat well with the rolling-pin, to make it 



PASTRY. 



27 



juicy and tender. If you put in the fat, it will 
make the gravy too greasy and strong, as it cannot 
be skimmed. 

Put a layer of meat over the bottom-crust of 
your dish, and season it to your taste, with pepper, 
salt, and, if you choose, a little nutmeg. A small 
quantity of mushroom ketchup is an improvement ; 
so also, is a little minced onion. 

Have ready some cold boiled potatoes sliced thin. , 
Spread over the meat, a layer of potatoes, and a 
small piece of butter; then another layer of meat, 
seasoned, and then a layer of potatoes, and so on till 
the dish is full and heaped up in the middle, having 
a layer of meat on the top. Pour in a little w T ater. 

Cover the pie with a sheet of paste, and trim the 
edges. Notch it handsomely with a knife ; and, 
if you choose, make a tulip of paste, and stick it 
in the middle of the lid, and lay leaves of paste 
round it. 



Fresh oysters will greatly improve a beef-steak 
pie. So also will mushrooms. 

Any meat pie may be made in a similar manner. 



INDIAN PUDDING. 

A pound of beef-suet, chopped very fine. 
A pint of molasses. 
A pint of rich milk. 
Four eggs. 

A large tea-spoonful of powdered nutmeg and cinnamon. 
A little grated or chipped lemon-peel. 
Indian meal sufficient to make a thick batter. 



Warm the milk and molasses, and stir them 
together. Beat the eggs, and stir them gradually 
into the milk and molasses, in turn with the suet 



28 



PASTRY. 



and indian meal. Add the spice and lemon-peel, 
and stir all very hard together. Take care not to 
put too much indian meal, or the pudding will be 
heavy and solid, 

Dip the cloth in boiling water. Shake it out, 
and flour it slightly. Pour the mixture into it, and 
tie it up, leaving room for the pudding to swell. 
Boil it three hours. Serve it up hot, and eat 
it with sauce made of drawn butter, wine and 
nutmeg. 

When cold, it is very good cut in slices and fried. 



BATTER PUDDING. 

Six eggs. 

Eight table-spoonfuls of sifted flour. 
One quart of milk. 
A salt-spoonful of salt. 

Stir the flour, gradually, into the milk, carefully 
dissolving all the lumps. Beat the eggs very light, 
and add them by degrees to the milk and flour. 
Put in the salt, and stir the whole well together. 

Take a very thick pudding-cloth. Dip it in 
boiling water and flour it. Pour into it the mixture 
and tie it up, leaving room for it to swell. Boil it 
hard, one hour, and keep it in the pot, till it is 
time to send it to table. Serve it up with wine- 
sauce. 



A square cloth, which when tied up will make the 
pudding of a round form, is better than a bag. 

Apple Batter Pudding is made by pouring the 
batter over a dish of pippins, pared, cored, and 
sweetened, either whole or cut in pieces. Bake it, 
and eat it with butter and sugar. 



PASTRY. 



29 



BREAD PUDDIXG. 

A quarter of a pound of grated stale bread. 

A quart of milk, boiled with two or three sticks of cinnamon, slight- 
ly broken. 
Eight eggs. 

A quarter of a pound of sugar. 
A little grated lemon-peel. 

Boil the milk with the cinnamon, strain it, and 
set it away till quite cold. 

Grate as much crumb of stale-bread as will weigh 
a quarter of a pound. Beat the eggs, and when 
the milk is cold, stir them into it, in turn with the 
bread and sugar. Add the lemon-peel, and if you 
choose, a table-spoonful of rose-water. 

Bake it in a buttered dish, and grate nutmeg 
over it when done. Do not send it to table hot. 
Baked puddings should never be eaten till they 
have become cold, or at least cool. 



RICE PUDDIJVG. 

A quarter of a pound of rice. 

A quarter of a pound of butter. 

A quarter of a pound of sugar. 

A pint and a half of milk, or cream and milk. 

A tea-spoonful of mixed spice, mace, nutmeg and cinnamon. 
A half wine-glass of rose-water. 



Wash the rice. Boil it till very soft. Drain it, 
and set it away to get cold. Put the butter and 
sugar together in a pan, aud stir them till very 
light. Add to them the spice and rose-water. 
Beat the eggs very light, and stir them, gradually, 
3* 



30 



PASTRY. 



into the milk. Then stir the eggs and milk into the 
butter and sugar, alternately with the rice. 

Bake it and grate nutmeg over the top. 

Currants or raisins, floured, and stirred in at the 
last, will greatly improve it. 

It should be eaten cold, or quite cool. 



BOSTON PUDDING. 

Make a good common paste with a pound and a 
half of flour, and three quarters of a pound of but- 
ter. When you roll it out the last time, cut off 
the edges, till you get the sheet of paste of an even 
square shape. 

Have ready some fruit sweetened to your taste. 
If cranberries, gooseberries, dried peaches, or dam- 
sons, they should be stewed, and made very sweet. 
If apples, they should be stewed in a very little wa- 
ter, drained, and seasoned with nutmeg, rose-water 
and lemon. If currants, raspberries, or blackber- 
ries, they should be mashed with sugar, and put 
into the pudding raw. 

Spread the fruit very thick, all over the sheet of 
paste, (which must not be rolled out too thin.) 
When it is covered all over with the fruit, roll it 
up, and close the dough at both ends, and down 
the last side. Tie the pudding in a cloth and 
boil it. 

Eat it with sugar. It must not be taken out of 
the pot till just before it is brought to table. 



PASTRY. 



21 



FRITTERS. 

Seven eggs. 

Half a pint of milk. 

A salt-spoonful of salt. 

Sufficient flour to make a thick batter. 



Beat the eggs well and stir them gradually into 
the milk. Add the salt, and stir in flour enough to 
make a thick batter. 

Fry them in lard, and serve them up hot. 

Eat them with wine and sugar. 



They are improved by stirring in a table-spoonful 
of yeast. 

They are excellent with the addition of cold 
stewed apple, stirred into the mixture, in which 
case use less flour. 



FINE CUSTARDS. 

A quart of milk or cream. 

The yolks.only, of sixteen egg9. 

Six ounces of powdered white sugar. 

Half an ounce of cinnamon, broken in small pieces. 

A large handful of peach-leaves, or half an ounce of peach-kernels 

or bitter almonds, broken in pieces. 
A table-spoonful of rose-water. 
A nutmeg. 

Boil in the milk the cinnamon, and the peach- 
leaves, or peach-kernels. When it has boiled, set 
it away to get cold. As soon as it is cold, strain 
it through a sieve, to clear it from the cinnamon, 
peach-leaves, &c. and stir into it, gradually, the 
sugar, spice, and rose-water. 

Beat the yolks of sixteen eggs very light, and 



32 



PASTRY. 



stir them by degrees into the milk, which must be 
quite cold or the eggs will make it curdle. Put the 
custard into cups and set them in a baking pan, half 
filled with water. When baked, grate some nut- 
meg over each, and ice them. Make the icing of 
the whites of eight eggs, a large tea-spoonful of 
powdered loaf-sugar, and six drops of essence of 
lemon, beaten all together till it stands alone. Pile 
up some of the icing on the top of each custard, 
heaping it high. Put a spot of red nonpareils on the 
middle of the pile of icings. 

If the weather is damp, or the eggs not new-laid, 
more than eight whites will be required for the 
icing. 



PLAIN CUSTARDS. 

A quart of rich milk. 
Eight eggs. 

A quarter of a pound of powdered sugar. 

A handful of peach-leaves, or half an ounce of peach-kernels, 

broken in pieces. 
A nutmeg. 

Boil the peach-leaves or kernels in the milk, and 
set it away to cool. When cold, strain out the 
leaves or kernels, and stir in the sugar. Beat the 
eggs very light, and stir them gradually into the 
milk, when it is quite cold. Bake it in cups, or in 
a large white dish. 

When cool, grate nutmeg over the top. 



PASTRY. 



33 



RICE CUSTARDS. 

Half a pound of rice. 

Half a pound of raisins or currants. 

Eight yolks of eggs, or six whole eggs. 

Six ounces of powdered sugar. 

A quart of rich milk. 

A handful of peach-leaves, or he If an ounce of peach-kernels, brok- 
en in pieces. 
Half an ounce of cinnamon, broken in pieces. 

Boil the rice with the raisins or currants, which 
must first be floured. Butter some cups or a 
mould, and when the rice is quite soft, drain it, and 
put it into them. Set it away to get cold. 

Beat the eggs well. Boil the milk with the 
cinnamon, and peach-leaves, or kernels. As soon 
as it has come to a boil, take it off and strain it 
through a sieve. Then set it again on the fire, stir 
into it alternately, the egg and sugar, taking it off 
frequently, and stirring it hard, lest it become a 
curd. Take care not to boil it too long, or it will 
be lumpy, and lose its flavour. When done, set it 
away to cool. Turn out the rice from the cups or 
mould, into a deep dish. Pour some of the boiled 
custard over it, and send up the remainder of the 
custard in a sauce-boat. 

You may, if you choose, ornament the lumps 
of rice, (after the custard is poured round them) 
by making a stiff froth of white of egg (beaten till 
it stands alone) and a few drops of essence of lem- 
on, with a very' little powdered loaf-sugar. Heap 
the froth on the top of each lump of rice. 



34 PASTRY. 



COLD CUSTARDS. 

A quart of new milk, and half a pint of cream, mixed. 
A quarter of a pound of powdered white sugar. 
A large glass of white wine. 
A nutmeg. 

Mix together the milk, cream, and sugar. Stir 
the wine into it, and pour the mixture into your 
custard-cups. Set them in a warm place near the 
fire, till they become a firm curd. Then set them 
on ice, or in a very cold place. Grate nutmeg 
over them. 



CURDS AND WHEY. 

Take a small piece of rennet about two inches 
square. Wash it very clean in cold water to 
get all the salt off, and wipe it dry. Put it in a 
tea-cup and pour on it just enough of lukewarm 
water to cover it. Let it set all night or for sever- 
al hours. Then take out the rennet, and stir the 
water in which it was soaked, into a quart of milk, 
which should be in a broad dish. 

Set the milk in a warm place, till it becomes a 
firm curd. As soon as the curd is completely 
made, set it in a cool place, or on ice (if in sum- 
mer) for two or three hours before you want to 
use it. 

Eat it with wine, sugar, and nutmeg. 



The whey, drained from the curd, is an excel- 
lent drink for invalids. 



PASTRY. 



35 



A TRIFLE. 

A quart of cream. 

A quarter of a pound of loaf-sugar, powdered. 

Half a pint of white wine ? mixed 

Half a gill of brandy 5 

Eight maccaroons, or more if you choose. 

Four small spunge-cakes or Naples Biscuit. 

Two ounces of blanched sweet almonds, pounded in a mortar. 

One ounce of blanched bitter almonds or peach-kernels. 

The juice and grated peel of two lemons. 

A nutmeg, grated. 

A glass of noyau. 

A pint of rich boiled custard, made of the' yolks of eggs. 



Pound the sweet and bitter almonds to a smooth 
paste, adding a little rose-water as you pound them. 

Grate the yellow peel of the lemons, and squeeze 
the juice into a saucer. 

Break the spunge-cake and maccaroons into 
small pieces, mix them with the almonds, and lay 
them in the bottom of a large glass bowl. Grate 
a nutmeg over them, and the juice and peel of the 
lemons. Add the wine and brandy, and let the 
mixture remain untouched, till the cakes are dis- 
solved in the liquor. Then stir it a little. 

Boil a pint of milk with a few peach-leaves. 
Strain it, and set it again on the fire. Beat the 
yolks of six eggs, and stir them into the milk, al- 
ternately with four ounces of powdered white su- 
gar. While the custard is boiling, take it frequently 
off the fire, and stir to prevent its curdling. When 
done, set it away to cool. 

Mix the cream and sugar with a glass of noyau, 
and beat it with a whisk or rods, till it stands alone. 

As the froth rises, take it off with a spoon, and 
lay it on a sieve (with a large dish under it) to drain. 
The cream, that drains into the dish, must be pour- 
ed back into the pan with the rest and beaten over 



36 



PASTRY. 



again. When the cream is finished, set it in a cool 
place. 

When the boiled custard -is cold, pour it into the 
glass bowl upon the dissolved cakes, &c. and 
when the cream is ready, fill up the bowl with it, 
heaping it high in the middle. You may ornament 
it with nonpareils. 

If you choose, you can put in, between the cus- 
tard and the frothed cream, a layer of fruit jelly, 
or small fruit preserved. 



WHIPT CREAM. 

A quart of cream. 

The whites of four eggs. 

Half a pint of white wine. 

A quarter of a pound of powdered loaf-sugar. 

Ten drops of strong- essence of lemon ; or two lemons cut in thin 
slices, or the juice of a large lemon. 



Mix together, in a broad pan, all the ingredients, 
unless you use slices of lemon, and then they must 
be laid at intervals among the froth, as you heap it 
in the bowl. 

With a whisk or rods, beat the cream to a strong 
froth. Have beside your pan a sieve (bottom up- 
wards) with a large dish under it. As the froth 
rises, take it lightly off with a spoon, and lay it on 
the sieve to drain. When the top of the sieve 
is full, transfer the froth to a large glass or china 
bowl. Continue to do this till the bowl is full. 

The cream which has dropped through the sieve 
into the dish, must be poured into the pan, and 
beaten over again. When all the cream is con- 
verted into froth, pile it up in the bowl, making it 
highest in the middle. 



PASTRY. 



37 



If you choose, you may ornament it with red 
and green nonpareils. 

If you put in glasses, lay a little jelly in the bot- 
tom of each glass, and pile the cream on it. 
Keep it in a cool place till you want to use it. 



FLOATING ISLAND. 

Six whites of eggs. 

Six large table-spoonfuls of jelly. 

A pint of cream. 

Put the jelly and white of egg into a pan, and 
beat it together with a whisk, till it becomes a stiff 
froth, and stands alone. 

Have ready the cream, in a broad shallow dish. 
Just before you send it to table, pile up the froth 
in the centre of the cream. 



ICE CREAM. 

A quart of rich cream. 

Half a pound of powdered loaf-sugar. 

The juice of two large lemons, or a pint of strawberries or rasp- 
berries. 

Put the cream into a broad pan, and squeeze 
the lemon juice into it, or stir in gradually the 
strawberries or raspberries, which must first be 
mashed to a smooth paste. Then stir in the su- 
gar by degrees, and when all is well mixed, strain 
it through a sieve. 

Put it into a tin that has a close cover, and set it 
4 



33 



PASTRY. 



in a tub. Fill the tub with ice broken into very 
small pieces, and strew among the ice a large quan- 
tity of salt,taking care that none of the salt gets into 
the cream. Scrape the cream down with a spoon 
as it freezes round the edges of the tin. When it 
is all frozen, dip the tin in lukewarm water ; take out 
the cream, and fill } r our glasses ; but not till a few 
minutes before you want to use it, as it will very 
soon melt. 

You may heighten the colour of the red fruit, by 
a little cochineal. 



If you wish to have it in moulds, put the cream 
into them as soon as it has frozen in the tin. Set 
the moulds in a tub of ice and salt. Just before 
you want to use the cream, take the moulds out of 
the tub, wipe or wash the salt, carefully from the 
outside, dip the moulds in lukewarm water, and 
turn out the cream. 



CALVES-FEET JELLY. 

Four calves feet. 

Three quarts of water. 

A pint of white wine. 

Three lemons. 

The whites of six eggs. 

Half an ounce of cinnamon. 

Half a ponnd of loaf-sugar, broken into lumps. 



Endeavour to procure calves feet, that have been 
nicely singed, but not skinned, as the skin being 
left on, makes the jelly much firmer. 

The day before you want to use the jelly, boil 
the four calves feet in three quarts of water, till 
the meat drops from the bone. When sufficiently 



PASTRY. 



59 



done, put it into a cullender or sieve, and let the 
liquid drain from the meat, into a broad pan or dish. 
Skim off the fat. Let the jelly stand till next day, 
and then carefully scrape off the sediment from 
the bottom. It will be a firm jelly, if too much 
water has not been used, and if it has boiled long 
enough. 

Early next morning, put the jelly into a tin ket- 
tle, or covered tin pan ; set it on the fire, and melt 
> it a little. Take it off, and season it with the cin- 
namon slightly broken, a pint of madeira wine, three 
lemons cut in thin slices, and half a pound of loaf- 
sugar, broken up. 

If you wish it high-coloured, add two table-spoon- 
fuls of French brandy. Mix all well together. 
Beat, slightly, the whites of six eggs (saving the 
egg-shells) and stir the whites into the jelly. Break 
up the egg-shells into very small pieces, and throw 
them in also. Stir the whole very well together. 

Set it on the fire, and boil it hard five minutes, 
but do not stir it, as that will prevent its clear- 
ing. Have ready a large white flannel bag, the 
top wide, and the bottom tapering to a point. 
Tie the bag to the backs of two chairs, or to the 
legs of a table, and set a white dish or a mould 
under it. 

After the jelly has boiled five minutes, pour it 
hot into the bag, and let it drip through into the 
dish. Do not squeeze the bag, as that will make 
the jelly dull and cloudy. 

If it is not clear the first time it passes through 
the bag, empty out all the ingredients, wash the 
bag, suspend it again, put another white dish under 
it, pour the jelly back into the bag, and let it drip 
through again. Repeat this six or eight times, or 
till it is clear, putting a clean dish under it every 



40 



PASTRY. 



time. If it does not drip freely, move the bag into 
a warmer place. 

When the jelly has all dripped through the bag, 
and is clear, set it in a cool place to congeal. It 
will sometimes congeal immediately, and sometimes 
not for several hours, particularly if the weather is 
warm and damp. If the weather is very cold, you 
must take care not to let it freeze. When it is 
quite firm, which perhaps it will not be till evening, 
fill your glasses with it, piling it up very high. If 
you make it in a mould, you must either set the 
mould under the bag while it is dripping, or pour 
it from the dish into the mould while it is liquid. 
When it is perfectly congealed, dip the mould for 
an instant in boiling water to loosen the jelly. Turn 
it out on a glass dish. 

This quantity of ingredients will make a quart of 
jelly when finished. In cool weather, it may be 
made a day or two before it is wanted. 

You may increase the seasoning, (that is, the 
wine, lemon, and cinnamon,) according to your 
taste, but less than the above proportion will not 
be sufficient to flavour the jelly. 



BLANCMANGE, 

Four calves feet. 

A pint and a half of thick cream. 

Half a pound of loaf-sugar, broken up. 

A glass of wine. 

Haifa glass of rose-water. 

A tea-spoonful of mace, beaten and sifted. 

Get four calves feet ; if possible some that have 
been singed, and not skinned. Scrape, and clean 
them well, and boil them in three quarts of water, 
till all the meat drops off the bone. Drain the 



PASTRY. 



41 



liquid through a cullender or sieve, and skim it 
well. Let it stand till next morning, to congeal. 
Then clean it well from the sediment, and put it in- 
to a tin or bell-metal kettle. Stir into it, the cream, 
sugar, and mace. Boil it hard for five minutes, 
stirring it several times. Then strain it through 
a linen cloth or napkin into a large bowl, and add 
the wine and rose-water. 

Set it in a cool place for three or four hours, 
stirring it very frequently with a spoon to prevent 
the cream from separating from the jelly. The 
more it is stirred the better. Stir it till it is cool. 

Wash your moulds, wipe them dry, and then wet 
them with cold water. When the blancmange be- 
comes very thick, (that is, in three or four hours, if 
the weather is not too damp) put it into your 
moulds. 

When it has set in them till it is quite firm, loos- 
en it carefully all round with a knife, and turn it 
out on glass or china plates. 

If you wish to make it with almonds, take an 
ounce of blanched bitter almonds, and two ounces 
of sweet. Beat them in a mortar to a fine paste, 
pouring in occasionally a little rose-water. When 
the mixture is ready to boil, add the almonds to it, 
gradually, stirring them well in. Or you may stir 
them in, while it is cooling in the bowl. 

If it inclines to stick to the moulds, set them an 
instant in hot water. It will then turn out easily. 

If you choose to make it without calves feet, you 
can substitute an ounce of the best and cleareit 
isinglass, (or, if in summer, an ounce and a quarter) 
boiled with the other ingredients. If made with 
4* 



42 



isinglass, you must use two ounces of sweet, and an 
ounce of bitter almonds, with the addition of the 
grated rind of a large lemon, and a large stick of 
cinnamon, broken up, a glass of wine and half a 
glass of rose-water. These ingredients must be all 
mixed together, with a quart of cream, and boiled 
hard for five minutes. The mixture must then be 
strained through a napkin, into a large bowl. Set 
it in a cool place, and stir it frequently till nearly 
cold. It must then be put into the moulds. 

You may substitute for the almonds, half a gil! of 
noyau, in which case, omit the wine. 



PART THE SECOND. 



CAKES. 



GENERAL, DIRECTIONS. 

In making cakes, it is particularly necessary that 
the eggs should be well beaten. They are not suf- 
ficiently light, till the surface looks smooth and lev- 
el, and till they get so thick as to be of the consis- 
tence of boiled custard. 

White of egg should always be beaten till it be- 
comes a heap of stiff froth, without any liquid at 
the bottom ; and till it hangs from the rods or fork 
without dropping. 

Eggs become light soonest when new-laid, and 
when beaten near the fire, or in warm dry weather. 

Butter and sugar should be stirred till it looks 
like thick cream, and till it stands up in the pan. 

It should be kept cool. If too warm, it will make 
the cakes heavy. 

Large cakes should be baked in tin or earthen 
pans, with straight sides, that are as nearly perpen- 
dicular as possible. They cut into handsomer slices, 
and if they are to be iced, it will be found very in- 
convenient to put on the icing, if the cake slopes in 
much towards the bottom. 

Before you ice a cake, dredge it all over with 



46 



CARES. 



flour, and then wipe the flour off. This will enable 
you to spread on the icing more evenly. 

Before you cut an ice cake, cut the icing by it- 
self with a small sharp penknife. The large knife 
With which you divide the cake, will crack and 
break the icing. 

Large Gingerbread, as it burns very easily, may 
be baked in an earthen pan. So also may Black 
Cake or Pound Cake. Earthen pans or moulds, 
with a hollow tube in the middle, are best for cakes. 

If large cakes are baked in tin pans, the bottom 
and sides should be covered w r ith sheets of paper, 
before the mixture is put in. The paper must be 
well buttered. 

Spunge cakes, and Almond cakes should oe baked 
in pans that are as thin as possible. 

If the cakes should get burnt, scrape them with 
a knife or grater, as soon as they are cool. 

Always be careful to butter your pans well. 
Should the cakes stick, they cannot be got out 
without breaking. 

For queen-cakes, he. the small tins of a round 
or oval shape are most convenient. Fill them but 
little more than half. 

After the mixture is completed, set it in a cool 
place till all the cakes are baked. 

In rolling out cakes made of dough, use as little 
flour as possible. When you lay them in the pans, 
do not place them too close together, lest they run 
into each other. 

When you are cutting them out, dip the cutter 
frequently in flour, to prevent its sticking. 



CAKES. 



47 



QUEEN CAKE. 

One pound of powdered white sugar. 
One pound of fresh butter — washed. 
Fourteen ounces of sifted flour. 
Ten eg^s. 

One wine-glass of wine and brandy, mixed. 

Half a glass of rose-water, or twelve drops of essence of lemon. 

One tea-spoonfnl of mace and cinnamon, mixed. 

One nutmeg, beaten or gratech 

Pound the spice to a fine powder, in a marble 
mortar, and sift it well. 

Put the sugar into a deep earthen pan, and cut 
the butter into it. Stir them together, till very 
light. 

Beat the eggs in a broad shallow pan, till they 
are perfectly smooth and thick. 

Stir into the butter and sugar a little of the beat- 
en egg, and then a little flour, and so on alternate- 
ly, a little egg and a little flour, till the whole is in ; 
continuing all the time to beat the eggs, and stir- 
ring the mixture very hard. Add by degrees, the 
spice, and then the liquor, a little at a time. Final- 
ly, put in the rose-water, or essence of lemon. Stir 
the whole very hard at the last. 

Take about two dozen little tins, or more, if you 
have room for them in the oven. Rub them very 
well with fresh butter. With a spoon, put some of 
the mixture in each tin, but do not fill them to the 
top, as the cakes will rise high in baking. Bake 
them in a quick oven, about a quarter of an hour. 
When they are done, they will shrink a little from 
the sides of the tins. 

Before you fill the tins again, scrape them well 
with a knife, and wash or wipe them clean. 

If the cakes are scorched by too hot a fire, do 



48 



CAKES. 



not scrape off the burnt parts, till they have 
grown cold. 

Make an icing with the whites of three eggs, 
beaten till it stands alone, and twenty-four tea- 
spoonfuls of the best loaf-sugar, powdered, and 
beaten gradually into the white of egg. Flavour it 
with a tea-spoonful of rose-water or eight drops of 
essence of lemon, stirred in at the last. Spread 
it evenly with a broad knife, over the top of 
each queen-cake, ornamenting them, (while the 
icing is quite wet) with red and green nonpareils, 
or fine sugar-sand, dropped on, carefully, with the 
thumb and finger. 

When the cakes are iced, set them in a warm 
place to dry ; but not too near the fire, as that will 
cause the icing to crack. 



POUND CAKE. 

One pound of flour, sifted. 

One pound of white sugar, powdered and sifted. 
One pound of fresh butter. 
Ten eggs. 

Half a glass of wine ^ 

Half a glass of brandy > mixed. 

Hylf a glass of rose-water j 

Twelve drops of essence of lemon. 

A table-spoonful of mixed mace and cinnamon. 

A nutmeg, powdered. 

Pound the spice and sift it. There should be 
twice as much cinnamon as mace. Mix the cinna- 
mon, mace, and nutmeg together. 

Sift the flour into a broad pan, or wooden bowl. 
Sift the powdered sugar into a large deep pan, and 
cut the butter into it, in small pieces. If the weath- 
er is very cold, and the butter hard, set the pan 
near the fire for a few minutes ; but if the butter is 



CAKES. 



49 



too warm, the cake will be heavy. Stir the butter 
and sugar together, with a wooden stick, till they 
are very light, and white, and look like cream. 

Beat the eggs in a broad shallow pan with a 
wooden egg-beater or whisk. They must be beat- 
en till they are thick and smooth, and of the con- 
sistence of boiled custard. 

Pour the liquor and rose-water, gradually, into 
the butter and sugar, stirring all the time. Add, 
by degrees, the essence of lemon and spice. 

Stir the egg and flour alternately into the butter 
and sugar, a handful of flour, and about two spoon- 
fuls of the egg (which you must continue to beat all 
the time,) and when all is in, stir the whole mix- 
ture very hard, for near ten minutes. 

Butter a large tin pan, or a cake-mould, with an 
open tube rising from the middle. Put the mix- 
ture into it as evenly as possible. Bake it in a 
moderate oven, for two, three, or four hours, in 
proportion to its thickness, and to the heat of the 
fire. 

When you think it is nearly done, thrust a twig or 
wooden skewer into it, down to the bottom. If the 
stick comes out clean and dry, the cake is almost 
baked. When quite done, it will shrink from the 
sides of the pan, and cease making a noise. Then 
withdraw the coals (if baked in a dutch oven) take 
off the lid, and let the cake remain in the oven to 
cool gradually. 

You may ice it, either warm or cold. 



5 



5Q 



CAKES. 



i . T /j#d, i fliiu ifrii Nil 

BLACK CAKE, OR PLUM CAKE. 



One pound of flour, sifted. 

One pound of fresh butter. 

One pound of powdered white sugar. 

Twelve eggs. 

Two pounds of the best raisins. 
Two pounds of currants. 

Two table-spoonfuls of mixed spice, mace and cinnamon. 
Two nutmegs, powdered. 
A large glass of wine ^ 



Half a glass of rose-water j 
A pound of citron. 

Pick the currants very clean, and wash them, 
draining them through a cullender. Wipe them in 
a towel. Spread them out on a large dish, and 
set them near the fire or in the hot sun to dry, plac- 
ing the dish in a slanting position. Having stoned 
the raisins, cut them in half, and when all are done, 
sprinkle them well with sifted flour, to prevent 
their sinking to the bottom of the cake. When the 
currants are dry, sprinkle them also with flour. 

Pound the spice, allowing twice as much cinna- 
mon as mace. Sift it, and mix the mace, nutmeg, 
and cinnamon together. Mix also the liquor and 
rose-water, in a tumbler or cup. Cut the citron in 
slips. Sift the flour into a broad dish. Sift the 
sugar into a deep earthen pan, aud cut the butter 
into it. Warm it near the fire, if the weather is too 
cold for it to mix easily. Stir the butter and sugar 
to a cream. 

Beat the eggs as light as possible. Stir them 
into the butter and sugar alternately with the flour. 
Stir very hard. Add, gradually, the spice and 
liquor. Stir the raisins and currants alternately 
into the mixture, taking care that they are well 



A large 





with any thing more appropriate than wITn 
account of a remarkable scene which took placd 
in Mr. Beccher's church a Sunday or two pinceJ 
We chanced to be an eye-witness of the occur-l 
rence, (says the Editor of Life Illustrated, frou 
which paper we copy the account,) but, in-| 
stead of giving our own impressions, we thini 
it best to copy the literal narrative of thd 
Herald's reporter, a paper that can not be sus-l 
pected of giving an unduly favorable coloring 
to any act of Henry Ward Beecher's. 

14 The morning sermon over," says the Ileri 
aid, "a curious scene occurred. Mr. Beechef 
stated that he was about to do something wlrichl 
perhaps, would be misunderstood, and suhjecl 
him to considerable criticism and animadv 
sion. He read the following from the 12tl 
chapter of Matthew, to show that he had 
precedent in the conduct of Christ for what hi 
was about to do : 

9. And when he was departed thence, he went into thei| 
synagogue. 

10. And behold, there was a man which had his han| 
withered. And they asked him, saying Is it lawful to he; 
on the Sabbath day ? that they might accuse him. 

11. And he said unto them, What man shall there 1 
among you that shall have one sheep, and if it fall into a \ 
on the Sabbath day, will he not lay hold on it ami lift it out| 

12. How much then is a man better than a sheep : 
Wherefore it is lawful to do well on the Sabbath day. 

13. Then saith he to the man, Stretch forth thy hand.- 



Eds. Rural : — The following recipes I have 
i found to be first rate : 

Mountain Cake. One cup sugar, 2 eggs, 4 
a cup of butter, 4 a cup of milk or water, 2 of 
flour. Teaspoonful cream tartar, 4 teaspoon 
of soda, nutmeg. 

Jumbles. One lb. of butter, 1 of sugar, 2 
of" flour, 3 eggs, 4 cup of sour milk, 1 teaspoon 
I of soda, roll in white coffee sugar. This will 
! make a large batch — if a small quantity be 
I wanted, take proportionately less of material. 

Ginger Snaps. One cup of butter, 1 of su- 
! gar, 1 of molasses, 4 cup of ginger, teaspoon 
. soda, mix stiff. 

A Small Sponge Cake. One cup of sugar, 
; 4 cup of milk, 1 egg, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, 
! 1 of soda, butter size of an egg. 

Whigs. Mix 4 a lb. of sugar with 6 oz. 
1 butter, 2 eggs, teaspoon cinnamon. Stir in 2 
• lbs. flour, a teacup of yeast, milk enough to 
make a stiff batter, when light bake in cups. 

Rochester, N. Y. Louise. 



Poor Man's Cake. One cup sugar, half cup 
! butter, one do. sour cream, one egg, flour enough 
! to make a good batter, half teaspoonful sale- 
I ratus. 



CAKES. 



51 



floured. Stir the whole as hard as possible, for 
ten minutes after all the ingredients are in. 

Cover the bottom and sides of a large tin or 
earthen pan, with sheets of white paper well butter- 
ed, and put into it some of the mixture. Then 
spread on it some of the citron, which must not be 
cut too small. Next put a layer of the mixture, 
and then a layer of citron, and so on till it is all in, 
having a layer of the mixture at the top. 

This cake is always best baked in a baker's 
oven, and will require four or five hours in propor- 
tion to its thickness. 

Ice it, next day. 



SPURGE CAKE. 

Twelve e*rgs. 

Ten ounces of sifted flour, dried nea r the fire. 
A pound of loaf-sugar, powdered and sifted. 
Twelve drops of essence of lemon. 
A grated nutmeg. 

A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon and mace, mixed. 

Beat the eggs as light as possible. Eggs for 
spunge or almond-cakes require more beating 
than for any other purpose. Beat the sugar, by 
degrees, into the eggs. Beat very hard, and con- 
tinue to beat some time after the sugar is all in. 

No sort of sugar but loaf, will make light spunge- 
cake. Stir in, gradually, the spice and essence of 
lemon. Then, by degrees put in the flour, a lit- 
tle at a time, stirring round the mixture very slowly 
with a knife. If the flour is stirred in too hard, 
the cake will be tough. It must be done lightly 
and gently, so that the top of the mixture will be 
covered with bubbles. As soon as the flour is all 
in, begin to bake it, as setting will injure it. 



r j2 



CAKES. 



Put it in small tins, well buttered, or in one 
large tin pan. The thinner the pans, the better 
for spunge-cake. Fill the small tins about half 
full. Grate loaf-sugar over the top of each, before 
you set them in the oven. 

Spunge-cake requires a very quick oven, partic- 
ularly at the bottom. It should be baked as fast 
as possible, or it will be tough and heavy, however 
light it may have been before it went into the oven. 
It is of all cakes the most liable to be spoiled in 
baking. When taken out of the tins, the cakes 
should be spread on a sieve to cool. If baked in 
one large cake, it should be iced. 

A large cake of twelve eggs, should be baked at 
least an hour in a quick oven. 

For small cakes, ten minutes is generally suffi- 
cient. If they get very; much out of shape in bak- 
ing, it is a sign that the oven is too slow. 

Some think that spunge-cakes and almond cakes 
are lighter, when the yolks and whites of the eggs 
are beaten in separate pans, and mixed gently to- 
gether before the sugar is beaten into them. 

If done separately from the yolks, the whites 
should be beaten till they stand alone. 



ALMOND CAKE. 

Two ounces of blanched bitter almonds, pounded very fine. 
Seven ounces of flour, sifted and dried. 
Ten eggs. 

One pound of loaf-sugar, powdered and sifted. 
Two table-spoonfuls of rose-water. 



Take two ounces of shelled bitter almonds, or 
pe ach-kernels. Scald them in hot water, and as 



CAKES. 



53 



you peel them, throw them into a bowl of cold wa- 
ter. Then wipe them dry, and pound them one 
by one in a mortar, till they are quite fine and 
smooth. 

Break ten eggs, putting the yolks in one pan and 
the whites in another. Beat them separately as 
light as possible, the whites first, and then the 
yolks. 

Add the sugar, gradually, to the yolks, beating 
it in very hard. Then, by degrees, beat in the 
almonds, and then add the rose-water. 

Stir half the whites of eggs, into the yolks and 
sugar. Divide the flour into two equal parts, and 
stir in one half, slowly and lightly, till it bubbles on 
the top. Then the other half of the white of egg, 
and then the remainder of the flour, very lightly. 

Butter a large square tin pan, or one made of 
paste-board, which will be better. Put in the mix- 
ture, and set immediately in a quick oven, which 
must be rather hotter at the bottom than at the top. 
Bake it according to the thickness. If you allow 
the oven to get slack, the cake will be spoiled. 

Make an icing with the whites of three eggs, 
twenty-four tea-spoonfuls of loaf-sugar, and eight 
drops of essence of lemon. 

When the cake is cool, mark it in small squares 
with a knife. Cover it with icing, and ornament it 
while wet, with nonpareils dropped on in borders, 
round each square of the cake. When the icing 
is dry, cut the cake in squares, cutting through the 
icing very carefully with a penknife. Or you may 
cut it in squares first, and then ice and ornament 
each square separately. 



5* 



34 



CAKES. 



FREXCII ALMOND CAKE. 

Six ounces of shelled sweet almonds. 
Three ounces of shelled bitter almonds, or peach kernels. 
Three ounces of sifted flour, dried near the lire. 
Fourteen eggs. 

One pound of powdered loaf-sugar. 
Twelve drops of essence of lemon. 



Blanch the almonds, by scalding them in hot 
water. Put them in a bowl of cold water, and 
wipe them dry, when you take them put. Pound 
them, one at a time, in a mortar, till they are per- 
fectly smooth. Mix the sweet and bitter almonds 
together- Prepare them, if possible, the day be- 
fore the cake is made. 

Put the whites and yolks of the eggs, into sepa- 
rate pans. Beat the whites till they stand alone, 
and then the yolks till they are very thick. 

Put the sugar, gradually, to the yolks, beating it 
in very hard. Add, by degrees, the almonds, still 
beating very hard. Then put in the essence of 
lemon. Next, beat in, gradually, the whites of 
the eggs, continuing to beat for some time after 
they are all in. Lastly, stir in the flour, as slowly 
and lightly, as possible. 

Butter a large tin mould or pan. Put the cake 
in, and bake it in a very quick oven, an hour or 
more, according to its thickness. 

The oven must on no account be hotter at the 
top, than at the bottom. 

When done, set it on a sieve to cool. 

Ice it, and ornament it with nonpareils. 

These almond cakes are generally baked in a 
turban-shaped mould, and the nonpareils put on, 
in spots or sprigs. 



CAKES. 



55 



A pound of almonds in the shells (if the shells 
are soft and thin,) will generally yield half a pound 
when shelled. Hard, thick-shelled almonds, sel- 
dom yield much more than a quarter of a pound, 
and should therefore never be bought for cakes or 
puddings. 

Bitter almonds and peach-kernels can always be 
purchased with the shells off. 



Families should always save their peach-kernels, 
as they can be used in cakes, puddings and custards. 



MACCAROONS. 

Haifa pound of shelled sweet almonds. 

A quarter of a pound of shelled bitter almonds. 

The whites of three eggs. 

Twenty-four large tea-spoonfuls of powdered loaf-sugar. 
A tea-spoonful of rose-water. 

A large tea-spoonful of mixed spice, nutmeg, mace and cinnamon. 



Blanch and pound your almonds, beat them very 
smooth, and mix the sweet and bitter together ; 
do them, if you can, the day before you make the 
rnaccaroons. Pound and sift your spice. Beat 
the w hites of three eggs till they stand alone ; add 
tu ihem, very gradually, the powdered sugar, a 
spoonful at a time, beat it in very hard, and put in, 
by degrees, the rose-water and spice. Then stir 
in, gradually, the almonds. The mixture must be 
like a soft dough ; if too thick, it will be heavy ; if 
too thin, it will run out of shape. If you find your 
almonds not sufficient, prepare a few more, and stir 
them in. When it is all well mixed and stirred, 
put some flour in the palm of your hand, and taking 



56 



CAKES. 



up a lump of the mixture with a knife, roll it on 
your hand with the flour into a small round ball ; 
have ready an iron or tin pan, buttered, and lay the 
maccaroons in it, as you make them up. Place 
them about two inches apart, in case of their spread- 
ing. Bake them about eight or ten minutes in a 
moderate oven ; they should be of a pale brownish 
colour. If too much baked, they will lose their 
flavour ; if too little, they will be heavy. They 
should rise high in the middle, and crack on the 
surface. You may, if you choose, put a larger 
proportion of spice. 



APEES. 



A pound of flour, sifted. 
Haifa pound of butter. 

A glass of wine, and a tablespoonful of rose-water, mixed. 
Haifa pound of powdered white sugar. 
A nutmeg, grated. 

A tea-spoonful of beaten cinnamon and mace. 
Three table-spoonfuls of carraway seeds. 



Sift the flour into a broad pan, and cut up the 
butter in it. Add the carraways, sugar, and spice, 
and pour in the liquor by degrees, mixing it well 
with a knife. If the liquor is not sufficient to wet 
it thoroughly, add enough of cold water to make it a 
stiff dough. Spread some flour on your paste- 
board, take out the dough, and knead it very well 
with your hands. Put it into small pieces, and 
knead each separately, then put them all together, 
and knead the whole in one lump. Roll it out in a 
sheet about a quarter of an inch thick. Cut it out 
in round cakes, with the edge of a tumbler, or a tin 
of that size. Butter an iron pan, and lay the cakes 



CAKES. 



in it, not too close together. Bake them a few 
minutes in a moderate oven, till they are very 
slightly coloured, but not brown. If too much bak- 
ed, they will entirely lose their flavour. Do not 
roll them out too thin. 



JUMBLES. 

Three eggs. 

Half a pound of flour, sifted. 

Half a pound of butter. 

Half a pound of powdered loaf-sugar. 

A table-spoonful of rose-water. 

A nutmeg grated. 

A tea-spoonful of mixed mace and cinnamon. 



Stir the sugar and butter to a cream. Beat the 
eggs very light. Throw them, all at once, into the 
pan of flour. Put in, at once, the butter and su- 
gar, and then add the spice and rose-water. If you 
have no rose-water, substitute six or seven drops of 
strong essence of lemon, or more, if the essence is 
weak. Stir the whole very hard, with a knife. 

Spread some flour on your paste-board, and flour 
your hands well. Take up with your knife, a por- 
tion of the dough, and lay it on the board. Roll it 
lightly with your hands, into long thin rolls, which 
must be cut into equal lengths, curled up into rings, 
and laid gently into an iron or tin pan, buttered, 
not too close to each other, as they spread in bak- 
ing. Bake them in a quick oven about five min- 
utes, and grate loaf-sugar over them when cool. 



58 



CAKES. 



KISSES. 

One pound of the best loaf sugar ; powdered and sifted. 

The whites of four eggs. 

Twelve drops of essence of lemon. 

A tea-cup of currant jelly. 

Beat the whites of four eggs till they stand alone. 
Then beat in, gradually, the sugar, a tea-spoonful 
at a time. Add the escence of lemon, and beat 
the whole very hard. 

Lay a wet sheet of paper on the bottom of a 
square tin pan. Drop on it, at equal distances, a 
small tea-spoonful of stiff currant jelly. With a 
large spoon, pile some of the beaten white of egg 
and sugar, on each lump of jelly, so as to cover it 
entirely. Drop on the mixture as evenly as possi- 
ble, so as to make the kisses of a round smooth 
shape. 

Set them in a cool oven, and as soon as they are 
coloured, they are done. Then take them out, and 
place them two bottoms together. Lay them light- 
ly on a sieve, and dry them in a cool oven, till the 
two bottoms stick fast together, so as to form one 
ball or oval. 

SPANISH BUNS. 

Four eggs. 

Three quarters of a pound of flour, sifted. 

Half a pound of powdered while sugar. 

Two wine-glasses and a half of rich milk. 

Five ounces of fresh butter. 

A wine-glass and a half of the best yeast. 

A table-spoonful of rose-water. 

A grated nutmeg. 

A large tea-spoonful of powdered mace and cinnamon. 

Sift half a pound of flour into a broad pan, and 
sift a quarter of a pound, separately, into a deep 



CAKES. 



59 



plate, and set it aside. Put the milk into a soup- 
plate, cut up the butter, and set it on the stove or 
near the fire to warm, but do not let it get too hot. 
When the butter is very soft, stir it all through the 
milk with a knife, and set it away to cool. Beat 
the eggs very light and mix the milk and butter 
with them, all at once ; then pour all into the pan 
of flour. Put in the spice, and the rose-water, or 
if you prefer it, eight drops of essence of lemon ; 
Add the yeast, of which an increased quantity will 
be necessary, if it is not very strong and fresh. 
Stir the whole very hard, with a knife. Add the 
sugar gradually. If the sugar is not stirred in slow- 
ly, a little at a time, the buns will be heavy. Then, 
by degrees, sprinkle in the remaining quarter of a 
pound of flour. Stir all well together ; butter a 
square iron pan, and put in the mixture. Cover it 
with a cloth, and set it near the fire to rise. It will 
probably not be light in less than five hours. When 
it is risen very high, and is covered with bubbles, 
bake it in a moderate oven, about a quarter of an 
hour or more, in proportion to its thickness. 

When it is quite cool, cut it in squares, and 
grate loaf-sugar over them. This quantity will 
make twelve or fifteen buns. 

They are best the day they are baked. 

You may, if you choose, bake them separately, 
in small square tins, adding to the batter half a 
pound of currants or chopped raisins, well floured, 
and stirred in at the last. 

In making buns, stir the yeast well before you 
put it in, having first poured ofY the beer or thin part 
from the top. If your yeast is not good, do not at- 



60 



CAKES. 



tempt to make buns with it, as they will never 
be light. 

Buns may be made ina plainer way, with the 
following ingredients, mixed in the above manner. 



Half a pound of flour, sifted into a pan. 

A quarter of a pound of flour, sifted inaplate ; and set aside to sprin- 
kle in at the last. 
Three eggs, well beaten. 
A quarter of a pound of powdered sugar. 
Three wine-glasses of milk. 
A wine-glass and a half of the best yeast. 
A large tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon. 
A quarter of a pound of butter, cut up, and warmed in the milk. 



RUSK. 

A quarier of a pound of powdered sugar. 
A quarter of a pound of fresh butter. 
One pound of flour sifted. 
One egg. 

Three wine-glasses of milk. 

A wine-glass and a half of the best yeast. 

A table-spoonful of rose-water. 

A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon. 

Sift your flour into a pan. Cut up the butter in 
the milk, and warm them a little, so as to soften the 
butter, but not to melt it entirely. Beat your egg ; 
pour the milk and butter into your pan of flour, 
then the egg, then the rose-water and spice, and 
lastly the yeast. Stir all well together with a knife. 

Spread some flour on your paste-board : lay the 
dough on it, and knead it well. Then divide it in- 
to small pieces of an equal size, and knead each 
piece into a little thick round cake. Butter an iron 
pan, lay the cakes in it, and set them in a warm 
place to rise. Prick the tops with a fork. When 
they are quite light, bake them in a moderate oven. 



CAKES. 



61 



INDIAN POUND CAKE. 



Eight eggs. 

The weight of eight eggs in powdered sugar. 
The weight of six eggs in Indian meal, sifted. 
Haifa pound of butter. 

One nutmeg, grated,— or a tea-spoonful of cinnamon. 



Stir the butter and sugar to a cream. Beat the 
eggs very light. Stir the meal and eggs, alternate- 
ly, into the butter and sugar. Grate in- the nutmeg. 
Stir all well. Butter a tin pan, put in the mixture, 
and bake it in a moderate oven. 



CUP CAKE. 

Five eggs. 

Two large tea-cups full of molasses. 

The same of brown sugar, rolled fine. 

The same of fresh butter. 

One cup of rich milk. 

Five cups of flour, sifted. 

Half a cup of powdered allspice and cloves. 

Half a cup of ginger. 



Cut up the butter in the milk, and warm them 
slightly. Warm also the molasses, and stir it into 
the milk and butter : then stir in, gradually, the 
sugar, and set it away to get cool. 

Beat the eggs very light, and stir them into the 
mixture alternately with the flour. Add the ginger 
and other spice, and stir the whole very hard. 

Butter small tins, nearly fill them with the mix- 
ture, and bake the cakes in a moderate oven. 

6 



i 



C,2 



CAKES. 



IiOAP CAKE. 



Two pounds of sifted flour ; setting aside half a pound to sprinkle in 

at the last. 
One pound of fresh butter. 
One pound of powdered sugar. 
Four eggs. 

One pound of raisins, stoned, and cut in half. 
One pound of currants, washed and dried. 
Half a pint of milk. 
A glass of wine. 
A glass of brandy. 

A table-spoonful of mixed spice, mace, nutmeg and cinnamon. 
Half a pint of the best brewer's yeast } or more, if the yeast is not 
very strong. 

Cut up the butter in the milk, and warm it till the 
butter is quite soft ; then stir it together, and set it 
away to cool. It must not be made too warm. 
After you have beaten the eggs, mix them with the 
butter and milk, and stir the whole into the pan of 
flour. Add the spice and liquor, and stir in the 
sugar gradually. Having poured off the thin part 
•from the top, stir the yeast, and pour it into the mix- 
ture. Then sprinkle in the remainder of the flour. 

Have ready the fruit, which must be well floured, 
stir it gradually into the mixture. Butter a large 
tin pan, and put the cake into it. Cover it, and set 
it in a warm place for five or six hours to rise. 
When quite light, bake it in a moderate oven. 



Three pounds of flour, sifted. 

One pound of butter. 

A pound and a half of powdered sugar. 

Half a pint of milk. 

Two table-spoonfuls of brandy. 

A small tea-spoonful of pearl-ash dissolved in water. 

Four table-spoonfuls of can-away seeds. 



Cut the butter into the flour. Add the sugar and 
carravvay seeds. Pour in the brandy, and then the 



SUGAR BISCUITS. 



CAKE?. 



63 



milk. Lastly, put in the pearl-ash. Stir all well 
with a knife, and mix it thoroughly, till it be- 
comes a lump of dough. 

Flour your paste-board, and lay the dough on it. 
Knead it very well. Divide it into eight or ten 
pieces, and knead each piece separately. Then 
put them all together, and knead them very well in 
one lump- 
Cut the dough in half, and roll it out into sheets, 
about half an inch thick. Beat the sheets of dough 
very hard, on both sides, with the rolling-pin. Cut 
them out into round cakes with the edge of a tum- 
bler. Butter iron pans, and lay the cakes in them. 
Bake them of a very pale brown. If done too 
much they will lose their taste. 

These cakes kept in a stone jar, closely covered 
from the air, will continue perfectly good for seve- 
ral months. 



MILK BISCUITS. 

Two pounds of flour, sifted. 
Half a pouud of butter. 
Two eggs. 

Six wine-glasses of milk. 

Two wine-glasses of the best brewer's yeast, or three of good home- 
made yeast. 

Cut the butter into the milk, and warm it slightly 
on the top of the stove, or near the fire. Sift the 
flonr into a pan, and pour the milk and butter into it. 
Beat the eggs, and pour them in also. Lastly, the 
yeast. Mix all well together with a knife. 

Flour your paste-board, put the lump of dough 
on it, and knead it very hard. Then cut the dough 



i 



64 



CAKES. 



in small pieces, and knead them into round balls. 
Stick the tops of them with a fork. 

Lay them in buttered pans and set them to rise. 
They will probably be light in an hour. When 
they are quite light, put them in a moderate oven 
and bake them. 



They are best when quite fresh. 



BUTTER BISCUITS. 

Half a pound of butter. 
Two pounds of flour, sifted. 
Half a pint of milk, or cold water. 
A salt-spoonful of salt. 



Cut up the butter in the flour, and put the salt 
to it. Wet it to a stiff dough with the milk or wa- 
ter. Mix it well with a knife. 

Throw some flour on the paste-board, take the 
dough out of the pan, and knead it very well. 

Roll it out into a large thick sheet, and beat it 
very hard on both sides with the rolling-pin. Beat 
it a long time. 

Cut it out with a tin, or cup, into small round 
thick cakes. Beat each cake on both sides, with 
the rolling-pin. Prick them with a fork. Put 
them in buttered pans, and bake them of a light 
brown in a slow oven. 



CARES. 



GINGERBREAD NUTS. 



Two pounds of flour, sifted. 
One pound of fresh butter. 
Half a pound of brown sugar. 
One quart of sugar-house molasses. 
Two ounces of ginger, or more, if it is not very strong. 
Twelve dozen grains of allspice,) 



Cut up the butter in the flour. Spread the su- 
gar on your paste-board, and crush it very fine with 
the rolling-pin. Put it to the flour and butter, and 
then add the ginger and other spice. Wet the 
whole with the molasses, and stir all well together 
with a knife. 

Throw some flour on your paste-board, take the 
dough (a large handful at a time) and knead it in 
separate cakes. Then put all together, and knead 
it very hard for a long time, in one large lump. Cut 
the lump in half, roll it out in two even sheets, about 
half an inch thick, and cut it out in little cakes, with 
a very small tin, about the size of a cent. Lay 
them in buttered pans, and bake them in a moder- 
ate oven, taking care they do not scorch, as gin- 
gerbread is more liable to burn than any other 
cake. 

You may, if you choose, shape the gingerbread 
nuts, by putting flour in your hand, taking a very 
small piece of the dough, and rolling it into a little 
round ball. 

6* 



Six dozen cloves, 
Half an ounce of cinnamon, 




CAKES. 



COMMON GINGERBREAD. 

A pint of molasses. 

Half a pound of brown sugar. 

One pound of fresh butter. 

Two pounds and a half of flour sifted. 

A pint of milk. 

A small tea-spoonful of pearl-ash. 
A tea-cup full of ginger. 

Cut the butter into the flour. Crush the sugar 
with a rolling-pin, and throw it into the flour and 
butter. Add the ginger. 

Having dissolved the pearl-ash in the milk, stir 
the milk and molasses alternately into the other in- 
gredients. Stir it very hard for a long time, till it 
is quite light. 

Put some flour on your paste-board, take out 
small portions of the dough, and make it with your 
hand into long rolls. Then curl up the rolls into 
round cakes, or twist two rolls together, or lay them 
in straight lengths or sticks side by side, and touching 
each other. Put them carefully in buttered pans, 
and bake them in a moderate oven, not hot enough 
to burn them. If they should get scorched, scrape 
off with a knife, or grater, all the burnt parts, before 
you put the cakes away. 

You can, if you choose, cut out the dough with 
tins, in the shape of hearts, circles, ovals, &c. or 
you may bake it all in one, and cut it in squares 
when cold. 

If the mixture appears to be too thin, add, grad- 
ually, a little more sifted flour. 



CAKES. 



LAFAYETTE GINGERBREAD. 

Five eggs. 

Haifa pound of brown sugar. 

Half a pound of fresh butter. 

A pint of sugar-house molasses. 

A pound and a half of flour. 

Four table-spoonfuls of ginger. 

Two large sticks of cinnamon, ^ 

Three dozen grains of allspice, > powdered and sifted. 

Three dozen of cloves, j 

The juice and grated peel of two large lemons. 

Stir the butter and sugar to a cream. Beat the 
eggs very well. Pour the molasses, at once, into 
the butter and sugar. Add the ginger and other 
spice, and stir all well together. 

Put in the egg and flour alternately, stirring all 
the time. Stir the whole very hard, and put in the 
lemon at the last. When the whole is mixed, stir 
it till very light. 

Butter an earthen pan, or a thick tin or iron one, 
and put the gingerbread in it. Bake it in a mod- 
erate oven, an hour or more, according to its thick- 
ness. Take care that it does not burn. 

Or you may bake it in small cakes, on little tins. 

Its lightness will be much improved by a small 
tea-spoonful of pearl-ash dissolved in a table-spoon- 
ful of milk, and stirred lightly in at the last. Too 
much pearl-ash will give it an unpleasant taste. 

If you use pearl-ash, you must omit the lemon, 
as its taste will be entirely destroyed by the pearl- 
ash. You may substitute for the lemon, some rai- 
sins and currants, w T ell floured, to prevent their 
sinking. 

This is the finest of all gingerbread, but should 
not be kept long, as in a few days it becomes very 
hard and stale. 



CAKES 



A DOVER CAKE. 

Half a pint of milk. 

A small tea-spoonful of pearl-ash. 

One pound of sifted flour. 

One pound of powdered white sugar. 

Half a pound of butter. 

Six eggs. 

One glass of brandy. 

Half a glass of rose-water. 

One grated nutmeg. 

A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon. 



Dissolve the pearl-ash in the milk. Stir the su- 
gar and butter to a cream, and add to it, gradually, 
the spice and liquor. Beat the eggs very light, 
and stir them into the butter and sugar, alternately, 
with the flour. Add, gradually, the milk, and stir 
ihe whole very hard. 

Butter a large tin pan, and put in the mixture. 
Bake it two hours or more in a moderate oven. If 
not thick, an hour or an hour and a half will be suf- 
ficient. 

Wrap it in a thick cloth, and keep it from the 
air, and it will continue moist and fresh for two 
weeks. The pearl-ash will give it a dark colour. 

It will be much improved by a pound of raisins, 
stoned and cut in half, and a pound of currants, 
well washed and dried. 

Flour the fruit well, and stir it in at the last. 



CAKES. 



69 



CRULLERS. 

Half a pound of butter. 

Three quarters of a pound of powdered white sugar. 

Six eggs, or seven, if they are small. 
Two pounds of flour, sifted. 
A grated nutmeg. 

A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon. 
A table-spoonful of rose-water. 

Cut the butter into the flour, add the sugar and 
spice, and tnix them well together. 

Beat the eggs, and pour them into the pan of 
flour fcc. Add the rose-water, and mix the whole 
into a dough. If the eggs and rose-water are not 
found sufficient to wet it, add a very little cold wa- 
ter. Mix the dough very well with a knife. 

Spread some flour on your paste-board, take the 
dough out of the pan, and knead it very well. Cut 
it into small pieces, and knead each separately. 
Put all the pieces together, and knead the whole in 
one lump. Roll it out into a large square sheet, 
about half an inch thick. Take a jagging-iron, or, 
if you have not one, a sharp knife ; run it along 
the sheet, and cut the dough into long narrow 
slips. Twist them up in various Torms. Have 
ready an iron pan with melted lard. Lay the crul- 
lers lightly in it, and fry them of a light brown, 
turning them with a knife and fork, so as not to 
break them, and taking care that both sides are 
equally done. 

When sufficiently fried, spread them on a large 
dish to cool, and grate loaf-sugar over them. 

Crullers may be made in a plainer way, with the 
best brown sugar (rolled very fine,) and without 
spice or rose-water. 



70 



CAKES. 



They can be fried, or rather boiled, in a deep 
iron pot. They should be done in a large quantity 
of lard, and taken out with a skimmer that has holes 
in it, and held on the skimmer till the lard drains 
from them. If for family use, they can be made 
an inch thick. 



DOUGH NUTS. 

Three pounds of sifted flour. 
A pound of powdered sugar. 
Three quarters of a pound of butter. 
Four eggs. 

Half a large tea-cup full of best brewer's yeast. 

A pint and a half of milk. 

A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon. 

A grated nutmeg. 

A table-spoonful of rose-water. 

Cut up the butter in the flour. Add the sugar, 
spice, and rose-water. Beat the eggs, very light, 
and pour them into the mixture. Add the yeast, 
(half a tea-cup, or two wine-glasses full,) and then 
stir in the milk by degrees, so as to make it a soft 
dough. Cover it, and set it to rise. 

When quite light, cut it in diamonds with a jag- 
ging-iron, or a sharp knife, and fry them in lard. 
Grate loaf sugar over them when done. 



WAFFLES. 

Six eggs. 

A pint of milk. 

A quarter of a pound of butter. 

A quarter of a pound of powdered white sugar. 

A pound and a half of flour, sifted. 

A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon. 



Warm the milk slightly. Cut up the butter in it, 
and stir it a little. Beat the eggs well, and pour 



Cakes. 



71 



them into the butter and milk. Sprinkle in half 
the flour, gradually. Stir in the sugar, by degrees, 
and add the spice. Stir in, gradually, the remain- 
der of the flour, so that it becomes a thick batter. 

Heat your waffle-iron ; then grease it well, and 
pour in some of the batter. Shut the iron tight, 
and bake the waffle on both sides, by turning the 
iron. 

As the w r affles are baked, spread them out sepa- 
rately on a clean napkin. When enough are done 
for a plate-full, lay them on a plate in two piles, 
buttering them, and sprinkling each with beaten 
cinnamon. 



SOFT MUFFINS. 

Five eggs. 

A quart of milk. 

Two ounces of butter. 

A large tea-spoonful of salt. 

Two large table spoonfuls of brewer's yeast, or four of home-made 
yeast. 

Enough of sifted flour to make a stiff batter. 

Warm the milk and butter together, and add to 
them the salt. Beat the eggs very light, and stir 
them into the milk and butter. Then stir in the 
yeast, and lastly, sufficient flour to make a thick 
batter. 

Cover the mixture, and set it to rise, in a warm 
place, about three hours. 

When it is quite light, grease your baking-iron, 
and your muffin rings. Set the rings on the iron, 
and pour the batter into them. Bake them a light 
brown. When you split them to put on the butter, 
do not cut them with a knife, but pull them open 
with your hands. Cutting them while hot will 
make them heavy. 



72 



CAKES. 



INDIAN BATTER CAKES. 

A quart of sifted indian meal, ) . j 
A handful of wheat flour, sifted, 5 mixea - 
Three egs, well beaten. 

Two table-spoonfuls of fresh brewer's yeast, or four of home-made 

yeast. 

A large tea-spoonful of salt. 
A quart of milk. 

Make the milk quite warm, and then put into it 
the yeast and salt, stirring them well. Beat the 
eggs, and stir them into the mixture. Then, grad- 
ually, stir in the flour and indian meal. 

Cover the batter, and set it to rise four or five 
hours. Or if the weather is cold, and you want 
the cakes for breakfast, you may mix the batter late 
the night before. 

Should you find it sour in the morning, dissolve a 
small tea-spoonful of pearl-ash in as much water as 
will cover it, and stir it into the batter, letting it sit 
afterwards at least half an hour. This will take off 
the acid. 

Grease your baking-iron, and pour on it a ladle- 
full of the batter. When brown on one side, turn 
the cake on the other. 



FLANNEL CAKES OR CRUMPETS. 

Two pounds of flour ; sifted. 
Four egg's. 

Three table spoonfuls of the best brewer's yeast, or four and a half 

of home-made yeast. 
A pint of milk. 

Mix a tea-spoonful of salt with the flour, and set 
the pan before the fire. Then warm the milk, 



CAKES. 



and stir it into the flour, so as to make a stiff batter. 
Beat the eggs very light, and stir them into the 
yeast. Add the eggs and yeast to the batter, and 
beat all well together. If it is too stiff, add a little 
more warm milk. 

Cover the pan closely, and set it to rise near the 
fire. Bake it, when quite light. 

Have your baking-iron hot. Grease it, and pour 
on a ladle-full of batter. Let it bake slowly, and 
when done on one side, turn it on the other. 

Butter the cakes, cut them across, and send 
them to table hot. 



ROLLS. 



Three pints of flour, sifted. 
Two tea-spoonfuls of salt. 

Four table-spoonfuls of the best brewer's yeast, or six of home-made 
yeast. 

A pint of luke-warm water. 

Half a pint more of warm water, and a little more flour to rmr in 
before the kneading. 



Mix the salt with the flour, and make a deep 
hole in the middle. Stir the warm water into the 
yeast, and pour it into the hole in the flour. Stir it 
with a spoon just enough to make a thin batter, and 
sprinkle some flour over the top. Cover the pan, 
and set it in a warm place for several hours. 

When it is light, add half a pint more of luke- 
warm water ; and make it, with a little more flour, 
into a dough. Knead it very well for ten minutes. 



74 



CAKES. 



Then divide it into small pieces, and knead each 
separately. Make them into round cakes or rolls. 
Cover them, and set them to rise about an hour and 
a half. 

Bake them, and when done, let them remain uft 
the oven, without the lid, for about ten minutes. 



♦ 



PART THE THIRD. 



SWEETMEATS, 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS. 

In preparing sugar for sweetmeats, let it be en- 
tirely dissolved, before you put it on the fire. If 
you dissolve it in water, allow about half a pint of 
water to a pound of sugar. 

If you boil the sugar before you add the fruit to 
it, it will be improved in clearness, by passing it 
through a flannel bag. Skim off the brown scum, 
all the time it is boiling. 

If sweetmeats are boiled too long, they lose their 
avour, and become of a dark colour. 

If boiled too short a time, they will not keep well. 

You may ascertain when jelly is done, by drop- 
ping a small spoonful into a glass of water. 

If it spreads and mixes with the water, it requires 
more boiling. If it sinks in a lump to the bottom, 
it is sufficiently done. 

Raspberry jelly requires more boiling than any 
other sort. Black currant jelly less. 

7* 



79 



SWEETMEATS. 



APPLE JEL.LY. 

Take the best pippin, or bell-flower apples. No 
others will make good jelly. Pare, core, and quar- 
ter them. Lay them on a brass or bell-metal ket- 
tle, and put to them as much water only, as will 
cover them, and as much lemon-peel as you choose. 
Boil them till they are soft, but not till they break. 
Drain oft' the water through a cullender, and mash 
the apples with the back of a spoon. Put them 
into a jelly bag, set a deep dish or pan under it, and 
squeeze out the juice. 

To every pint of juice, allow a pound of loaf- 
sugar, broken up, and the juice of two lemons. 
Put the apple-juice, the sugar, and the lemon-juice, 
into the preserving kettle. Boil it a quarter of an 
hour, skimming it well. Take it immediately from 
the kettle, and pour it warm into your glasses, but 
not so hot as to break them. When cold, cover 
each glass with white paper dipped in brandy, and 
tie it down tight with another paper. Keep them 
in a cool place. 

Quince Jelly is made in the same manner, but do 
not pare them. Quarter them only. 



RED CURRANT JELXY. 

Wash your currants, drain them, and pick them 
from the stalks. Mash them with the back of a 
spoon. Put them in a jelly-bag, and squeeze it till 
all the juice is pressed out. 



SWEETMEATS. 



79 



To every pint of juice, allow a pound of the best 
loaf-sugar. Put the juice and the sugar into your 
kettle, and boil it fiteen minutes, skimming it all the 
while. Pour it warm into your glasses, set it for m 
several hours in the sun, and when cold, tie it up 
with brandy paper. Jellies should never be allow- 
ed to get cold in the kettle. If boiled too long, 
they will lose their flavour, and become of a dark 
colour. 

Strawberry, raspberry, blackberry, and grape 
jelly may be made in the same manner, and with 
the same proportion of loaf-sugar. 

Red currant jelly may also be made in a very 
simple manner, by putting the currants whole into 
the kettle, with the sugar ; allowing a pound of su- 
gar to a pound of currants. Boil them together 
fifteen minutes, skimming carefully. Then pour 
them into a sieve, with a pan under it. Let them 
drain through the sieve into the pan, pressing them 
down with the back of a spoon. 

Take the jelly, while warm, out of the pan, and 
put it into your glasses. Tie it up with brandy 
paper when cold. 



BLACK CURRANT JELLY. 

Pick the currants from the stalks, wash and drain 
them. Mash them soft with a spoon, put them in a 
bag, and squeeze out the juice. To each pint of 
juice, allow three quarters of a pound of loaf-sugar. 
Put the juice and sugar into a preserving kettle, 
and boil them about ten minutes, skimming them 



80 



SWEETMEATS. 



well. Take it immediately out of the kettle. Put 
it warm into your glasses. Tie it up with brandy 
papers. 

The juice of black currants is so very thick, that 
it requires less sugar and less boiling than any oth- 
er jelly. 



GOOS E r> E R U V JELLY. 



Cut the gooseberries in half, (they must be 
green) and put them in a jar closely covered. Set 
the jar in an oven, or pot tilled with boiling water. 
Keep the water boiling round the jar till the goose- 
berries are soft, take them out, mash them with a 
spoon, and put them into a jelly bag to drain. 
When all the juice is squeezed out, measure it, and 
to a pint of juice, allow a pound of loaf-sugar. 
Put the juice and sugar into the preserving kettle, 
and boil them fifteen minutes, skimmins; them care- 
fully. Put the jelly warm into your glasses. Tie 
them up with brandy paper. 

Cranberry jelly is made in the same manner. 



JELLY OF WILD GRAPES. 

Pick the grapes from the stems, wash and drain 
them. Mash them with a spoon. Put them in the 
preserving kettle, and cover them closely with a 
large plate. Boil them ten minutes. Then pour 
them into your jelly bag, and squeeze out the juice. 



SWEETHEATS. 



II 



Allow a pint of juice to a pound of sugar. Put the 
sugar and juice into your kettle, and boil them fif- 
teen minutes, skimming them well. 

Fill your glasses while the jelly is warm, and tie 
them up with brandy papers. 



PEACH JELLY. 

Wipe the wool off your peaches, (which should 
be free-stones, and not too ripe) and cut them in 
quarters. Crack the stones, and break the kernels 
small. 

Put the peaches and the kernels into a covered 
jar, set them in boiling water, and let them boil till 
they are soft. 

Strain them through a jelly-bag, till all the juice 
is squeezed out. Allow a pound of loaf-sugar to 
a pint of juice. Put the sugar and juice into a 
preserving kettle, and boil them fifteen minutes, 
skimming carefully. 

Put the jelly warm into your glasses, and when 
cold, tie them up with brandy paper. 

Plum, and green gage jelly may be made in the 
same manner, with the kernels, which greatly im- 
prove the flavour. 



UHIII Mil QUI5CKS. 



Pare and core your quinces, carefully taking out 
the parts that are knotty and defective. Cut ihem 
into quarters, or into round slices. Put them into 



82 



SWEETMEATS. 



a preserving kettle, and cover them with the parings 
and a very little water. Lay a large plate over 
them to keep in the steam, and boil them till they 
aie tender. 

Take out the quinces, and strain the liquor 
through a bag. To every pint of liquor, allow a 
pound of loaf-sugar. Boil the juice and sugar to- 
gether, about ten minutes, skimming it well. Then 
put in the quinces, and boil them gently twenty min- 
utes. When the sugar seems to have completely 
penetrated them, take them out, put them in a glass 
jar, and pour the juice over them warm. Tie them 
up, when cold, with brandy paper. 



In preserving fruit that is boiled first without the 
sugar, it is generally better (after the first boiling) to 
let it stand till next day before you put the sugar 
to it. 



PRESERVED PIPPINS. 

Pare and core some of the largest and finest pip- 
pins. Put them in your preserving kettle, with 
some lemon-peel, and all the apple-parings. Adda 
very little water, and cover them closely. Boil 
them till they are tender, taking care they do not 
burn. Take out the apples, and spread them on a 
large dish to cool. Pour the liquor into a bag, and 
strain it well. Put it into your kettle with a pound 
of loaf-sugar to each pint of juice, and add lemon 
juice to your taste. Boil it five minutes, skimming 
it well. Then put in the whole apples, and boil 
them slowly half an hour, or till they are quite soft 



SWEETMEATS. 



83 



and clear. Put them, with the juice, into your jars, 
and when quite cold, tie them up with brandy paper. 

Preserved apples are only intended for present 
use, as they will not keep long. 

Pears may be done in the same way, either whole 
or cut in half. They may be flavoured either with 
lemon or cinnamon, or both. The pears for pre- 
serving should be green. 



PRESERVED PEACHES. 

Take the largest and finest free-stone peaches, 
before they are too ripe. Pare them, and cut them 
in halves or in quarters. Crack the stones, and 
take out the kernels, and break them in pieces. 
Put the peaches, with the parings and kernels, into 
your preserving kettle, with a very little water. 
Boil them till they are tender. Take out the peach- 
es and spread them on a large dish to cool. Strain 
the liquor through a bag or sieve. Next day, 
measure the juice, and to each pint allow a pound 
of loaf-sugar. Put the juice and sugar into the ket- 
tle with the peaches, and boil them slowly half an 
hour, or till they are quite soft, skimming all the 
time. Take the peaches out, put them into your 
jars, and pour the warm liquor over them. When 
cold, tie them up with brandy paper. 

If boiled too long, they will look dull, and be of 
a dark colour. 

If you do not wish the juice to be very thick, do 
not put it on to boil with the sugar, but first boil the 



A 



84 



SWEETMEATS. 



sugar alone, with only as much water as will dis- 
solve it, and skim it well. Let the sugar, in all ca- 
ses, be entirely melted before it goes on the fire. 
Having boiled the sugar and water, and skimmed it 
to a clear syrup, then put in your juice and fruit to- 
gether, and boil them till completely penetrated 
with the sugar. 



PRESERVED CRAB APPLES. 

Wash your fruit. Cover the bottom of your 
preserving kettle with grape-leaves. Put in the 
apples. Hang them over the fire, with a very lit- 
tle water, and cover them closely. Do not allow 
them to boil, but let them simmer gently till they 
are yellow. Take them out, and spread them on 
a large dish to cool. Pare and core them. Put 
them again into the kettle, with fresh vine-leaves 
under and over them, and a very little water. Hang 
them over the fire till they are green. Do not let 
them boil. 

Take them out, weigh them, and allow a pound 
of loaf-sugar to a pound of crab-apples. Put to 
the sugar just water enough to dissolve it. When 
it is all melted, put it on the fire, and boil and skim 
it. Then put in your fruit, and boil the apples till 
they are quite clear and soft. Put them in jars, 
and pour the warm liquor over them. When cold, 
tie them up with brandy paper. 



PRESERVED PLUMS. 



Cut your plums in half, (they must not be quite 
ripe,) and take out the stones. Weigh the plums, 



SWEETMEATS. 



and allow a pound of loaf-sugar to a pound of fruit. 
Crack the stones, take out the kernels and break 
them in pieces. Boil the plums and kernels very 
slowly for about fifteen minutes, in as little water as 
possible. Then spread them on a large dish to 
cool, and strain the liquor. 

Next day make your syrup. Melt the sugar in 
as little water as will suffice to dissolve it, (about 
half a pint of water to a pound of sugar) and boil 
it a few minutes, skimming it till quite clear. Then 
put in your plums with the liquor, and boil them 
fifteen minutes. Put them in jars, pour the juice 
over them warm, and tie them up, when cold, with 
brandy paper. 

Syrups may be improved in clearness, by adding 
to the dissolved sugar and water, some white of 
egg very well beaten, allowing the whites of two 
eggs to each pound of sugar. Boil it very hard, 
and skim it well, that it may be quite clear before 
you put in your fruit. 



PRESERVED STRAWBERRIES. 

Weigh the strawberries after you have picked off 
the stems. To each pound of fruit allow a pound 
of loaf-sugar, which must be powdered. Strew 
half of the sugar over the strawberries, and let 
them stand in a cold place two or three hours. 
Then put them in a preserving kettle over a slow r 
fire, and by degrees strew on the rest of the sugar. 
Boil them fifteen or twenty minutes, and skim them 
well. 

8 



86 



SWEETMEATS. 



Put them in wide-mouthed bottles, and when 
cold, seal the corks. 

If you wish to do them whole, take them care- 
fully out of the syrup, (one at a time) while boiling. 
Spread them to cool on large dishes, not letting the 
strawberries touch each other, and when cool, re- 
turn them to the syrup, and boil them a little longer. 
Repeat this several times. 

Keep the bottles in dry sand, in a place that is 
cool and not damp. 

Gooseberries, currants, raspberries, cherries and 
grapes may be done in the same manner. The 
stones must be taken from the cherries (which 
should be morellas, or the largest and best red 
cherries) and the seeds should be extracted from 
the grapes with the sharp point of a penknife. 
Gooseberries, grapes, and cherries, require longer 
boiling than strawberries, raspberries or currants. 



PRESERVED CRANBERRIES. 

Wash your cranberries, weigh them, and to each 
pound allow a pound of loaf-sugar. Dissolve the 
sugar in a very little water, (about half a pint of wa- 
ter to a pound of sugar) and set it on the fire in a 
preserving kettle. Boil it near ten minutes, skim- 
ming it well. Then put in your cranberries, and 
boil them slowly, till they are quite soft, and of a 
fine colour. 

Put them warm into your jars or glasses, and tie 
them up with brandy paper, when cold. 

All sorts of sweetmeats keep better in glasses, 
than in stone or earthen jars. When opened for 



SWEETMEATS. 



87 



use, they should be tied up again immediately, as 
exposure to the air spoils them. 

Common glass tumblers are very convenient for 
jellies, and preserved small fruit. White jars are 
better than stone or earthen, for large fruit. 



PRESERVED PUMPKINS. 

Cut slices from a fine high-coloured pumpkin, 
and cut the slices into chips about the thickness of 
a dollar. The chips should be of an equal size, 
six inches in length, and an inch broad. Weigh 
them, and allow to each pound of pumpkin chips, a 
pound of loaf sugar. Have ready a sufficient num- 
ber of fine lemons, pare off the yellow rind, and lay 
it aside. Cut the lemons in half, and squeeze the 
juice into a bowl. Allow a jill of juice to each 
pound of pumpkin. 

Put the pumpkin into a broad pan, laying the su- 
gar among it. Pour the lemon-juice over it. Cov- 
er the pan, and let the pumpkin chips, sugar and 
lemon-juice, set all night. 

Early in the morning put the whole into a pre- 
serving pan, and boil all together (skimming it well) 
till the pumpkin becomes clear and crisp, but not 
till it breaks. It should have the appearance of 
lemon-candy. You may, if you choose, put some 
lemon-peel with it, cut in very small pieces. 

Half an hour's boiling (or a little more) is gener- 
ally sufficient. 

When it is done, take out the pumpkin, spread 
it on a large dish, and strain the syrup through a bag. 
Put the pumpkin into your jars or glasses, pour 
the syrup over it, and tie it up with brandy paper. 



ss 



SWEETMEATS. 



If properly done, this is a very fine sweetmeat. 
The taste of the pumpkin will be lost in that of the 
lemon and sugar, and the syrup is particularly 
pleasant. It is eaten withoutcream, like preserved 
ginger. It may be laid on puff-paste shells, after 
they ire baked. 



PRESERVED PINE-APPLE. 

. Pare your pine-apples, and cut them in thin round 
slices. Weigh the slices, and to each pound allow 
a pound of loaf-sugar. Dissolve the sugar in a 
very small quantity of water, stir it, and set it over 
the fire in a preserving-kettle. Boil it ten minutes, 
skimming it well. Then put in it the pine-apple 
slices, and boil them till they are clear and soft, but 
not till they break. About half an hour (or perhaps 
less time) will suffice. Let tnem cool in a large 
dish or pan, before you put them into your jars, 
which you must do carefully, lest they break. Pour 
the syrup over them. Tie them up with brandy- 
paper. 



RASPBERRY JAM. 

Allow a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit. 
Mash the raspberries, and put them with the sugar 
into your preserving kettle. Boil it slowly for an 
hour, skimming it well. Tie it up with brandy paper. 

All jams are made in the same manner. 



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